The MAD aims to provide increased flexibility and palatability, with a 1:1 ratio of fat to carbohydrates and protein, and contains around 65% fat, 25% protein, and 10% carbohydrate (Payne et al., 2018). Fat is encouraged and the carbohydrate intake is limited to 10–20 g/day in children and 15–20 g/day in adults (Kossoff, 2004; Kossoff and Dorward, 2008). Because of carbohydrate restriction, the MAD can also produce urinary ketones (Carrette et al., 2008). The MAD does not require weighing food on a gram scale, or restriction of calories, protein or liquids, and may be a good option for patients who are unable to tolerate a more restrictive diet such as the classical ketogenic diet (KD) (Cervenka et al., 2012). Low-carbohydrate multivitamin and calcium carbonate supplementation is recommended in the MAD (Kossoff et al., 2009).
They also noted that some patients were more responsive to the ketogenic diet than other patients were. The best response was in a 3-year-old girl who had complete remission five years of treatment with a ketogenic diet. Two other patients also experienced complete remission after the diet, and the other two patients had disease progression after stopping keto. (Keep in mind, however, that all of these patients used conventional treatments along with the keto diet.)
Here’s what happens when you eat low carb, high fat, keto. The small LDLP number goes way down. Along with the triglycerides dropping, along with the HDL going up, along with all those other great markers that improve that nobody’s paying attention to in the medical profession, your small LDL goes down. The question that comes into play here is “What about the number of total particles?” That’s the debate that nobody’s going to answer until we do some studies on it.
Serious complications of the ketogenic diet are rare and have only been described in single reports, including those of Fanconi’s renal tubular acidosis (in co-treatment with valproate), severe hypoproteinemia, marked increase in liver function tests (in co-treatment with valproate), cardiomyopathy, prolonged QTc, acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis, basal ganglia injury, scurvy, lipoid pneumonia, and propofol infusion syndrome.
To identify which genes might be involved, the researchers used microarray "gene chips" to examine changes in gene expression for more than 7,000 rat genes simultaneously. They focused on the hippocampus, a region of the brain known to play an important role in many kinds of epilepsies. More than 500 of the genes they examined were correlated with treatment with the KD. The most striking finding was the coordinated up-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism.

Importantly, cholesterol doesn’t travel around your bloodstream on its own. As a hydrophobic (water-repelling) substance, it must be packaged within lipoproteins to move around the bloodstream. So that means when we talk about blood cholesterol levels, we’re referring to the amount of cholesterol contained in different lipoprotein particles. In addition to cholesterol, these lipoprotein particles also contain special proteins called apolipoproteins, triglycerides and other compounds.
Weight Loss – Part of the resurgence in interest in the ketogenic diet is due to the work of Dr. Atkins and his low-carb diet for weight loss. There is strong evidence to support the use of a ketogenic diet as a weight loss therapy.18 19 People following a low-carb diet tend to lose more weight in the first 3-6 months than those following a more traditional diet.20 Part of the benefit likely comes from the fact that ketogenic diets tend to suppress appetite and lead to a natural decrease in calorie intake.21 But even in studies where participants on a low carb diet ate the same number of calories per day as those on a lowfat diet, significant differences in weight loss were observed.22 This is likely due to the fact that ketosis relies on fat from the diet and body fat to produce ketones for energy.
We admit approximately four children ranging from infants to adolescents each month to participate in the therapeutic ketogenic diet program. New patients take part in a 3-day orientation (Monday through Wednesday) that starts the child on the diet and provides education for the family. After that, we follow up with the patients in our clinic every one to three months.
If I were you I wouldn’t worry about that. I would just be glad that the word is getting out on combatting cancer. The rewards of spreading good helpful lifechanging knowledge are far greater than anything money can buy. Problems have always followed the attitude of profiteering vs benefitting all who need help. Pay it forward, pass it on, and Live!
You will need to learn how to prepare meals differently, which takes time and work. There also may be some difficulty adapting to the new meals. However, with creative meal planning and sensitivity to your difficulties, along with support from your ketogenic diet team some of these obstacles can be overcome. In time you will adapt with the significant changes and meal preparation and meal time will become easier. Many families cope well with the challenges and would agree that the hard work is worth it if the diet significantly reduces the seizures.
Clearly, ketogenic diets are not ready for prime time as a treatment for cancer, either alone or in combination with conventional therapy. Unfortunately, that hasn’t stopped it from being touted by all manner of alternative cancer practitioners (i.e., quacks) and others as a cancer cure that “they” don’t want you to know about or saying things like, “…it’s nothing short of medical malpractice and negligence to fail to integrate this type of dietary strategy into a patient’s cancer treatment plan,” as Joe Mercola did. Dr. Seyfried himself has contributed to the hyperbole quite a bit as well. For example:
The authors defined a VLCKD as a diet lower in 50g of carbohydrates – lower than the daily recommended grams of carb consumption clinicians recommend to diabetics. They included 13 randomized controlled studies with a total of 1,415 subjects. All studies took place for at least a full year and all subjects included were over 18 years old and had a BMI of at least 27.5 kg/m2. In each of these studies, VLCKD diets were compared to low-fat diets.

Fight Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet is not an academic exercise in what a ketogenic rendition of an anticancer diet should be. The information is firmly based on the science and research of Dr. Thomas Seyfried, who proposes that cancer is a metabolic disease, and on consultation with both Drs. Seyfried and Dominic D’Agostino on design and implementation of a ketogenic diet. Sound biochemical and physiological sciences support the book’s explanations and recommendations.
Notably, there is a relationship between metabolic and epigenetic modifications. Shimazu et al. (2013) observed that βOHB inhibits class I histone deacetylases. During the KD, the elevation of βOHB causes changes in large-scale gene transcription but particularly those linked to oxidative-stress resistance factors. This result emphasizes that the KD has a potential role as a disease-modifying treatment in epilepsy.
Leanne Vogel has experienced success in using her recipes and keto-based diet. It works with her lifestyle but there are no assurances or representations of any kind made by Leanne Vogel or Healthful Pursuit Inc. that you will attain any success in using the same recipes or adopting a keto-based diet. Healthful Pursuit provides information in respect to healthy living, recipes, nutrition, and diet and is intended for informational purposes only. The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment nor is it to be construed as such. We cannot guarantee that the information provided by Healthful Pursuit reflects the most up-to-date medical research. Information is provided without any representations or warranties of any kind. Please consult a qualified physician for medical advice, and always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding your health and nutrition program.
Similarly, in a 2015 study, mice receiving a combination of hyperbaric oxygen and dietary ketone supplementation showed a clear reduction in tumor growth rate and metastasis.20 Also, these mice lived twice as long as control animals. Based on these results, the study authors state that further investigation into the effectiveness of this combination therapy as a potential treatment for late-stage metastatic cancers is urgently required.

“But if you’re a young and healthy adult, I have no safety concerns about removing carbs,” he adds. “It’s really not a radical concept.” You may experience some short-term issues like bad breath, constipation and flu-like symptoms. (Drinking lots of water can help.) But the lasting benefits could range from reduced hunger and increased energy to weight loss. Some preliminary research even hints at memory improvements.
Research here is conflicting. While you might think reducing insulin-triggering carbohydrate foods would improve insulin sensitivity, that isn’t always the case. Rodent studies found at least in the short-term, ketogenic diets increased glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Researchers speculate part of this insulin resistance occurs because of keto-adaptation, and once your body adjusts to ketosis, you become more insulin sensitive. Your mileage will vary, of course, and I believe going too low-carb could create these and other potential dangers.
There’s a really great inflammatory marker that you can have any doctor can run this for about fifty bucks, and insurance should cover it. It’s called HSCRP, high-sensitivity C reactive protein, and that is the key marker. There’s some other inflammatory markers in the body but that one will really tell the tale of whether you have high levels of inflammation or not. Ideally you want that one optimally under 1.0, most certainly under 3.0. My recent one just a few months back, Leanne, was 0.44.
The first study looking at the ketogenic diet and cancer was published in 1995 in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. In it, researchers recruited two young female patients at the University Hospitals of Cleveland. Both had Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), a form of cancer that starts in the brain and rapidly spreads throughout the body.
I have been on a low carb keto diet for more than a year. As T2DM my A1C dropped from 9% to 5.4% & I discontinued meds. All my lipids improved even with ample healthy saturated fat. More than a year now so I wonder why this would be a short term improvement when its obvious that I will not go back to a high A1C and taking 3 diabetes medications including sulphonylureas. It is clear from this article that you lack the necessary experience that would be gained from wholeheartedly trying the diet or monitoring patients doing it properly like me. I would be probably be facing my first amputation if I believed the negativity in your article. So for people with diabetes who may be dissuaded by your article. Ignore it and take back your health by restricting carbs (<25 g a day) or as low as you reasonably can below 130g while being satisfied that you are getting adequate nutrition.
During the 1920s and 1930s, when the only anticonvulsant drugs were the sedative bromides (discovered 1857) and phenobarbital (1912), the ketogenic diet was widely used and studied. This changed in 1938 when H. Houston Merritt, Jr. and Tracy Putnam discovered phenytoin (Dilantin), and the focus of research shifted to discovering new drugs. With the introduction of sodium valproate in the 1970s, drugs were available to neurologists that were effective across a broad range of epileptic syndromes and seizure types. The use of the ketogenic diet, by this time restricted to difficult cases such as Lennox–Gastaut syndrome, declined further.[10]

Of the many benefits of a keto diet, weight loss is often considered No. 1., as it can often be substantial and happen quickly (especially for those who start out very overweight or obese). The 2013 study published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those following a keto diet “achieved better long-term body weight and cardiovascular risk factor management when compared with individuals assigned to a conventional low-fat diet (i.e. a restricted-energy diet with less than 30 percent of energy from fat).” (2)
Quite the contrary, as I discussed in a previous article, I met Kelley through a journalist friend who thought he might make an excellent subject for a potboiler, a wealth-generating best seller. After only a few days in Kelley’s Dallas office, I quickly realized that he, as odd as he may have seemed to some, as peculiar as his therapy might be to conventional researchers, had put together a potentially useful, non-toxic, nutritional cancer treatment.
The use of the LGIT in the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy was initially reported in 2005 by Pfeifer and Thiele (2005). This alternative diet treatment is based on a ratio 0.6:1 of fat to carbohydrates and protein, containing 60% fats, 30% protein, and 10% carbohydrates with a low glycemic index (GI) (GI<50) (Pfeifer and Thiele, 2005; Payne et al., 2018). The GI measures the tendency of a food to raise the blood glucose levels, compared to an equivalent amount of the reference carbohydrate, usually glucose (Pfeifer et al., 2008). Compared to classic the KD, the LGIT produces a smaller increase in ketone body levels, but has comparable efficacy, better tolerability and easier implementation (Pfeifer and Thiele, 2005; Pfeifer et al., 2008).
There are some treatment centers like Care Oncology Clinic in the UK and ChemoThermia Oncology Center in Istanbul that are using ketogenic diet and fasting along with glucose inhibitors and conventional treatment like chemo. They claim to be getting good results, but I don’t know much about these cancer centers above and beyond what I just told you. Note that keto only seems to work with the faster-growing cancers like breast cancer, but not as much with slower-growing cancers like prostate cancer. 

Leigh Tracy, RD, a dietitian and certified diabetes educator at The Center for Endocrinology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, also advised people to remember that the study did not focus on whether or not the keto diet prevented or inhibited cancer growth — only on changes to the body including the fact that the diet reduced that patients’ central body fat, improved insulin levels, and improved lean body mass.

Close attention to growth measurements, laboratory data, and medical supervision is indicated in infants on the ketogenic diet. A prospective cohort study of 237 children, with an average length of follow-up of 308 days, analyzed height and weight measurements over time on the ketogenic diet. A small decrease in height scores was observed in the first 6 months, with bigger changes by 2 years. There was a drop in weight in the first 3 months; after this, the weight remained constant in children who started the diet below the 50th percentile for their weight, while it continued to decrease in children starting above the 50th percentile. Very young children (0–2 years) grew poorly on the diet, while older children (7–10 years) grew almost normally. Recent studies of children who discontinued the diet suggest that growth will catch up once the diet is discontinued.
The failure of Big Pharma to develop an Alzheimer's drug has been well-documented in the corporate-sponsored "mainstream" media. As Alzheimer's diagnoses continue to increase, drug companies are scrambling to develop the next big drug to market to seniors. In modern times, the most successful drugs in sales, so far, have been cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, as one out of every five people over the age of 50 are now taking drugs to lower one's cholesterol, raking in billions of dollars for pharmaceutical companies. The sick irony to this is that lowering one's cholesterol artificially is directly linked to declining cognitive health and diseases such as Alzheimer's, since 25% of one's total cholesterol is located in the brain. The failed scientific hypothesis behind these drugs is that cholesterol is a cause of heart disease, and that diets high in saturated fats contribute to high cholesterol. However, the actual science shows almost the opposite, and when one looks at death rates, for example, lower cholesterol rates do not equate to longer life - in fact the converse is true: higher cholesterol levels lead to longer life spans. The pharmaceutical industry and the U.S. government cannot afford to reverse their warnings against saturated fats and cholesterol, however, as it would be the same as confessing that the entire statin drug industry has been a scam, and that statin drugs actually cause more harm than good. This is the main reason why the USDA must continue supporting a low-fat diet and condemning saturated fats, even though the science does not support their positions. It is no surprise, therefore, to learn that peer-reviewed scientific studies continue to show that the high-fat ketogenic diet supports cognitive health and can help prevent or reduce cognitive diseases such as Alzheimer's. Here are four new studies just published on the high-fat ketogenic diet related to cognitive health, and preventing Alzheimer's Disease.

Normally, our bodies run on energy from glucose, which we get from food. We can’t store large amounts of glucose, however. We only have about a 24-hour supply. When a child has no food for 24 hours — which is the way the diet begins, usually in a hospital — he or she uses up all the stored glucose. With no more glucose to provide energy, the child’s body begins to burn stored fat.

As individuals in general, we never hesitate to gorge on pounds of sugar with, before, and after every meal. Sugars and carbohydrates should rarely be included in our diets. One century ago, the average US citizen consumed 5 pounds of sugar per year; today, we consume an inconceivable average of 150 pounds per year. This becomes even more horrifying when we realize it only takes 100 grams of sugar to restrain our white blood cell’s ability to kill the bad cells in our body by 90% for several hours; this happens within 15 minutes of digestion. Founder of the American Anti-Cancer Institute (AACI), Bob Wright, adds, “One can of [soda] has enough sugar to shut down 50% of our immune system for a minimum of 4 hours.” When we consume sugar, we are simultaneously shutting off our defenses while pouring gasoline on the fire that is cancer. When we take into account that “50 to 70% of our total immune system cells cannot see cancer … even on our best day,” the notion of adding it to our diet seems even more blasphemous.
Your current cholesterol levels l is higher than I would personally feel comfortable with. I would consider making a few dietary changes (i.e., increasing fiber and net carbs, reducing saturated fat, and increasing protein), especially given your lack of improved cognition and decreased ability to work out. I wish you the best of luck going forward. - Franziska
The Keto diet emphasizes weight loss through fat-burning. The goal is to quickly lose weight and ultimately feel fuller with fewer cravings, while boosting your mood, mental focus and energy. According to Keto proponents, by slashing the carbs you consume and instead filling up on fats, you safely enter a state of ketosis. That’s when the body breaks down both dietary and stored body fat into substances called ketones. Your fat-burning system now relies mainly on fat – instead of sugar – for energy. While similar in some ways to familiar low-carb diets, the Keto diet’s extreme carb restrictions – about 20 net carbs a day or less, depending on the version – and the deliberate shift into ketosis are what set this increasingly popular diet apart.
This study shows the beneficial effects of ketogenic diet following its long-term administration in obese subjects with a high level of total cholesterol. Moreover, this study demonstrates that low carbohydrate diet is safe to use for a longer period of time in obese subjects with a high total cholesterol level and those with normo-cholesterolemia.
Ketone bodies, acetoacetate, and β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB), are byproducts of fatty acid oxidation in the mitochondrial matrix of the hepatocytes. There are many theories about the role of KB, but the existence of an anticonvulsant effect is controversial. Some authors have found no relationship between KB and synaptic transmission and seizure control.

• Your body is still growing — In one study, epileptic children experienced a reduction in symptoms and improved cognitive performance when a ketogenic diet was introduced.49 However, this may have a negative effect on the growth of their bodies in the long run, according to a study published in the journal Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology.50
Dr. Gonzalez wrote an eight part article series for Natural Health 365 on the history and failure of the ketogenic diet for cancer. Dr. Gonzalez’s nutritional cancer treatment expertise is much deeper than ANYONE currently promoting the ketogenic diet for cancer, because unlike anyone else promoting it, he actually treats cancer patients with nutrition every day.
In its strictest form, the ketogenic diet provides more than 90 percent of its calories through fat (as compared to the 25 to 40 percent usually recommended for children). When we burn fat for energy, rather than glucose from carbohydrates, we produce compounds known as ketone bodies—hence the name “ketogenic diet.” The increase in ketones—referred to as ketosis—is thought to have an anticonvulsant effect in the brain, although how this works is still something of a mystery.
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