Energy Deprivation. By its nature, the ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates (typically 20 to 50 grams/day) and naturally restricts calorie consumption. This restricts the amount of fuel that cancer cells receive, even for the cancer cells that are able to thrive off of multiple substrates. Furthermore, almost all cancer cells seem to lack the ability to use the ketones produced when carbs consumption is restricted. Thus, cancer patients who are keto-adapted will probably be the most effective at starving cancer cells.
The remaining calories in the keto diet come from protein — about 1 gram (g) per kilogram of body weight, so a 140-pound woman would need about 64 g of protein total. As for carbs: “Every body is different, but most people maintain ketosis with between 20 and 50 g of net carbs per day,” says Mattinson. Total carbohydrates minus fiber equals net carbs, she explains.
But in Dr. Price’s day, many groups living in many different locations still lived according to tradition largely untouched by modern Western influence. Price’s travels took him from the Eskimos of the Arctic, to the descendents of the Incas living in the high Andes, to the Masai on the plains of Kenya, to isolated Swiss herders in the Alpine mountain valleys, to Polynesians living on pristine tropical islands.
They need to make a lot of ATP, and quickly, to support their high requirements for energy. Adenosine triphosphate, also known as ATP, is a compound that provides energy to drive hundreds of thousands of biochemical processes in living cells. Found in all forms of life, ATP is often referred to as the chemical energy “currency” that powers metabolic activity.
A more recent clinical trial comparing a ketogenic diet (33.5% protein, 56% fat, 9.6% carbohydrate) to a low-fat diet (22% protein, 25% fat,55.7% carbohydrate) among 55 obese adults, showed that the ketogenic diet resulted in improved cholesterol levels compared to the low-fat diet. More specifically, the group following the ketogenic diet reported higher increases in HDL cholesterol and higher decreases in triglyceride levels compared to the control group (15).
High-protein ketogenic diet (HPKD): This version of the keto diet is often followed by folks who want to preserve their muscle mass like bodybuilders and older people. Rather than protein making up 20 percent of the diet, here it’s 30 percent. Meanwhile, fat goes down to 65 percent of the diet and carbs stay at 5 percent. (Caution: folks with kidney issues shouldn’t up their protein too much.)

People claiming huge benefits of these supplements – despite the lack of solid scientific support – may sometimes have a financial reason to believe in the supplements. Some of these products are sold under a multi-level marketing arrangement, where sales people are paid based on commission. For example, the company Prüvit sells drinkable ketones, called KETO//OS with a multi-level marketing structure.

Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes – Several studies have evaluated the effects of a low carbohydrate ketogenic diet on type 2 diabetes, with promising results. Among the benefits seen are improved blood glucose profiles, improved insulin sensitivity, improvements in hemoglobin A1c, decreased triglycerides, increased HDL cholesterol (commonly thought of as ‘good’ cholesterol), and an improved total cholesterol to HDL ratio.23 24 25 26 The aforementioned improvements not only support those with existing type 2 diabetes, but also those with metabolic syndrome.


When you restrict your carbohydrate intake to less than 50 grams daily, you can still fit in plenty of nonstarchy vegetables, maybe some low-glycemic (meaning they don’t bump your blood sugar) blueberries and other berries, and a small amount of non-gluten grains like quinoa (actually a seed and complete protein). But you’ve got very little wiggle room there before you theoretically get knocked out of ketosis.


It’s not heart healthy because it’s raising inflammation. The reason they put in on there though is it does one thing on your cholesterol panel that they think is good. It lowers the LDLC number. It does. It will do it all day everyday. You can sit there and drink Canola oil, and your LDL will go down, your LDLC. That LDLC is just a calculated number using this thing called the Friedewald equation and it’s not directly measured. That’s another thing people don’t realize. LDLC is just totally an estimated number. When your triglycerides are under 100 and your HDL is over 50, it totally miscalculates what your LDL is. That’s why that NMR lipo profile test to know the particles is so important. I know I’m talking fast and saying a lot of technical terms.
Here’s what happens when you eat low carb, high fat, keto. The small LDLP number goes way down. Along with the triglycerides dropping, along with the HDL going up, along with all those other great markers that improve that nobody’s paying attention to in the medical profession, your small LDL goes down. The question that comes into play here is “What about the number of total particles?” That’s the debate that nobody’s going to answer until we do some studies on it.
Reduced hunger. Many people experience a marked reduction in hunger on a keto diet. This may be caused by an increased ability of the body to be fueled by its fat stores. Many people feel great when they eat just once or twice a day, and may automatically end up doing a form of intermittent fasting. This saves time and money, while also speeding up weight loss.
Just because your favorite celebrity endorses a program doesn’t mean you should try it. No plan works for everyone, and that goes double for ketogenic diets. As I mentioned before, while they can initially create fat loss, ketogenic diets were never designed to help you lose weight. Especially if you’re eating too many calories—very possible on a high-fat ketogenic diet—you can be in ketosis and not lose weight (or even gain weight). Likewise, many people lose weight just fine without ever "going keto."
But no fear, there’s always a new miracle around the corner, and in 1998 the newspaper reporters and TV newscasters, having effortlessly drifted away from interferon and interleukin-2 and the bone marrow transplant craze, were all in a tizzy over the newest “final” solution to cancer, anti-angiogenesis, based on the pioneering work of the late Dr. Judah Folkman of Harvard. Dr. Folkman had spent decades studying the process of angiogenesis in cancer tissues, the formation of new blood vessels that allow tumors to grow quickly and invade through normal tissues and organs with deadly effect.
In the 1920s, a German biochemist named Otto Warburg observed that most cancers get their fuel differently than normal cells, a phenomenon dubbed the "Warburg effect". The difference, in simple terms, is that cancer cells consume a lot more glucose than healthy cells. So, because cancer relies heavily on glucose, the idea is that putting your body in a state of ketosis — which lowers blood sugar levels — might effectively "starve" cancer cells because there's less glucose to consume.
Treatment with MAD was shown to be more effective in seizure control when the MAD was started with lower carbohydrate limits (Kossoff et al., 2010). In a randomized study with 20 children with drug-resistant epilepsy, 60% of them showed fewer seizures in the first 3 months on the MAD, with 10 g/day of carbohydrate intake against 10% of reduction with 20 g/day (p = 0.03). In the same study, after 3 months, an increase in carbohydrate intake to 20 g/day, maintained seizure control and improved tolerability, suggesting that a lower carbohydrate limit is important only in the first 3 months (Kossoff et al., 2007; Kossoff and Dorward, 2008).
It is possible to combine the results of several small studies to produce evidence that is stronger than that available from each study alone—a statistical method known as meta-analysis. One of four such analyses, conducted in 2006, looked at 19 studies on a total of 1,084 patients.[23] It concluded that a third achieved an excellent reduction in seizure frequency and half the patients achieved a good reduction.[18]
For most people, a ketogenic diet leads to improvements in cholesterol, but there are sometimes transient rises in cholesterol levels during weight loss. During rapid weight loss, cholesterol that you had stored in your adipose tissue (ie, body fat) is mobilized, which will artificially raise serum LDL as long as the weight loss continues. To avoid being misled by this, the best time to check blood lipids is a couple of months after weight loss ceases. Total cholesterol includes HDL (the so called ‘good cholesterol’), which usually goes up 10-15% on a ketogenic diet. That said, some people have high calculated LDL cholesterol values even after weight loss stops. If this occurs, you should discuss further diagnostic tests with your doctor. Current research is looking at LDL cholesterol as a mix of different particle sizes, where the small ones are dangerous and the larger ones are not. With a well-formulated ketogenic diet, we see a shift away from the small dangerous LDL even when the total LDL goes up.
Cancer is not a single disease, but rather a group of diseases all of which share the common feature of abnormal cell growth. Cancer cells either stay put where they are formed or spread to other parts of the body. In the U.S. alone, it is estimated that nearly 2 million new cases of cancer will have been diagnosed in 2018, while over 600,000 people will have died as a consequence of this disease.7
There is a lot I could respond to here, I’m a little surprised that you would include a study that feeds pregnant and lactating mice a diet (Teklad diet no. TD.96355) consisting of almost entirely hydrogenated vegetable shortening (Crisco), and also casein and corn oil, and calls it a “ketogenic diet.” On top of the fact that it’s a mice study. There is no evidence to show that there is any danger in pregnant and lactating women eating a (real) ketogenic diet. The only issue is that if a lactating woman switches from SAD to keto, “keto flu” may reduce her milk supply.
Recent studies show that low-carb diets such as keto are more effective at raising good (HDL) cholesterol than low-fat diets [1, 2]. However, there are also studies showing that keto can increase total cholesterol (HDL and LDL) [3]. On the other hand, low-carb, high-fat diets also decrease LDL particle concentration (LDL-P), increase the size of LDL cholesterol and decrease the amount of harmful VLDL cholesterol in the blood [2], all of which have a positive effect on cardiovascular fitness. 

Keto flu symptoms and side effects can include feeling tired, having difficulty sleeping, digestive issues like constipation, weakness during workouts, being moody, losing libido and having bad breath. Fortunately, these side effects don’t affect everyone and often only last for 1–2 weeks. (And yes, you CAN build muscle on keto.) Overall, symptoms go away as your body adjusts to being in ketosis.

Epilepsy is a disorder where recurrent seizures (fits) are caused by abnormal electrical discharges from the brain. In most people seizures can be controlled by one or more antiepileptic medicines, but seizures may not be helped by these medicines after a while (called drug‐resistant epilepsy). For people who have drug‐resistant epilepsy, a special diet (called a ketogenic diet) may be considered. Ketogenic diets are high in fat and low in carbohydrate.
Leanne: Yeah, that believed in coconut from the very beginning and they didn’t go on this campaign of ridding it from the earth. I’m totally pro coconut oil and saturated fat. It’s been so great chatting with you about this cholesterol piece. I hope that a lot of our listeners, watchers, readers are going to benefit from the information that you’ve shared. If they want to know more about you Cholesterol Clarity is awesome. Keto Clarity is great. Your podcast, just download every single podcast Jimmy’s ever made. It will keep you busy for the next two years.
Not surprisingly, he immediately and strongly advised that I abandon the keto lifestyle in favor of the Mediterranean diet. I was incredibly disappointed, given the ease with which I had lost weight, though I understood his position and followed his counsel. In the past several weeks, I have gained some weight back, though certainly not all, and generally feel unhappy about the direction I seem to be headed. I have not had cholesterol levels checked again. I very much want to return to the keto lifestyle I was following, but I respect my provider and don’t want to make decisions that might lead me to poorer health down the road.

Leanne: Yeah totally, chill out. Do a little meditation if you need to get into the zone. Exactly. You mentioned vegetable oils causing inflammation, are there specific fats that will help us, like we’ve talked a little bit about saturated fats, we all know trans fats don’t even go there … the mono poly saturated, unsaturated, is there a certain ratio that we should be aiming for. I know you’re the guy that will just slice off butter and eat it … I am too, a little bit of Himalayan rock salt on there never hurt anyone. Are there specific facts that we should be focusing on?

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