Ketosis is a natural metabolic state where the body uses fat as its primary fuel source. In our studies and others, the ketogenic diet has shown to significantly lower blood glucose. This can trigger anti-inflammatory processes that enhance cellular function and improve overall dog health. The remarkable case studies we saw at the KetoPet Sanctuary indicate that the ketogenic diet can improve outcomes for dog cancer and support overall dog health.
Jimmy Moore: This is where the fat, fat, fat comes in. That’s why I add butter and add coconut oil and the full fat dairy, and all the things that you can add fat to your diet and it makes it taste good. That’s the thing, people are like “Well, it’s not supposed to taste good, I’m on a diet.” I’m like “no, you’re on a live-it. Please live it up and have the fat.”
The KetoPet Sanctuary was started in 2014 to rescue shelter dogs with terminal cancer and give them a forever home. Once at KetoPet, each dog was placed on a raw ketogenic diet (high fat, adequate protein, very low carbohydrates). We then did something that was never done before: we used PET (positron emission tomography) to image disease and validate our nutrition-first approach. While not a cure, we found a raw ketogenic diet to be effective in improving outcomes for dogs with cancer. Even more, these case studies support our belief that all dogs should eat a raw ketogenic diet optimal health.
Our regimen is a modification of the classic ketogenic diet, similar to the Atkins diet. Recent studies have shown that this modified Atkins diet lowers seizure rates in nearly half of adults that try it, usually within a few months. Unlike the ketogenic diet for children, this therapy does not require a hospital stay, an initial fasting period, food weighing, fluid measuring, or calorie counting.
Dr. Campos, it is unfortunate that you retain the medical community’s negative stance on the ketogenic diet, probably picked up in medical school when you studied ketoacidosis, in the midst of an obesity and type II diabetes epidemic that is growing every year, especially among populations who will never see the Harvard Health Letter. The medical community has failed in reversing this trend, especially among children, and the public is picking up the tab, in the form of higher health insurance premiums to treat chronic metabolic diseases which doctors cannot cure. The ketogenic diet does not bid its adherents to eat unhealthy processed meats, and the green leafy vegetables that it emphasizes are important in a number of nutritional deficiencies. People lose weight on the ketogenic diet, they lose their craving for sugar, they feel more satiety, they may become less depressed, their insulin receptors sensitivity is improved, and these are all the good outcomes you fail to mention. There is a growing body of research which demonstrates the neuroprotective effects of the ketogenic diet to slow cancer progression, as well as diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, for which there are no effective medical treatments. Please respect your patients by providing them with evidence-based medical outcomes, not opinions.

However, this doesn't happen in every case or even most cases. In fact, many people see little to no increase in their LDL cholesterol while experiencing beneficial changes in other markers, such as an increase in HDL cholesterol and a decrease in triglycerides, blood sugar, and insulin levels – all of which are associated with reduced risk of CVD.
The first modern study of fasting as a treatment for epilepsy was in France in 1911.[12] Twenty epilepsy patients of all ages were "detoxified" by consuming a low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with periods of fasting and purging. Two benefited enormously, but most failed to maintain compliance with the imposed restrictions. The diet improved the patients' mental capabilities, in contrast to their medication, potassium bromide, which dulled the mind.[13]
When in the hospital, glucose levels are checked several times daily and the patient is monitored for signs of symptomatic ketosis (which can be treated with a small quantity of orange juice). Lack of energy and lethargy are common, but disappear within two weeks.[17] The parents attend classes over the first three full days, which cover nutrition, managing the diet, preparing meals, avoiding sugar, and handling illness.[19] The level of parental education and commitment required is higher than with medication.[44]

The first few days of keto can be difficult as your body adjusts to a low carbohydrate intake; you may experience symptoms such as brain fog, headache, insomnia, irritability, and digestive issues. These symptoms are commonly referred to as the “keto flu” and are caused by the glycogen loss, low insulin levels, and dehydration that frequently occur when you suddenly cut back on carbs. Know that these symptoms will pass, especially if you make sure to drink plenty of water, replenish your electrolyte levels, and eat sufficient protein and calories. At the most, it may take a couple weeks for the keto flu to subside, but for most people, this uncomfortable period passes within a few days.
A meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials following overweight and obese participants for 1-2 years on either low-fat diets or very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets found that the ketogenic diet produced a small but significantly greater reduction in weight, triglycerides, and blood pressure, and a greater increase in HDL and LDL cholesterol compared with the low-fat diet at one year. [10] The authors acknowledged the small weight loss difference between the two diets of about 2 pounds, and that compliance to the ketogenic diet declined over time, which may have explained the more significant difference at one year but not at two years (the authors did not provide additional data on this).
Differences between ketosis and ketoacidosis Ketosis and ketoacidosis both involve increased levels of ketones in the body. However, they are not the same thing. Nutritional ketosis is the aim of the ketogenic diet, and it is generally safe, whereas ketoacidosis is a complication of type 1 diabetes that can be life-threatening. Learn more here. Read now
Additionally, HDL cholesterol may have anti-inflammatory effects. A recent research study published by De Nardo et al shows that HDL may be responsible in reducing inflammatory activity by regulating immune system cells called macrophages. [5] Furthermore, epidemiological studies have noted an inverse association between levels of HDL and certain forms of cancer. [6, 7]
Teens and young adults who are becoming more independent often find the ketogenic diet too difficult to follow. Dietary options for epilepsy have expanded in recent years to include the modified Atkins diet and the low-glycemic index treatment diet. The latter diet does not necessarily cause ketosis, and may instead curb seizures by lowering glucose levels in the blood and possibly in brain cells.
In both patients, levels of blood glucose decreased to low/normal levels and ketones increased by 20 to 30 times within seven days of starting the ketogenic diet.  Results from scans indicated that there was a 21.8% decrease in glucose uptake at the tumor sites in both subjects. Lower glucose uptake is a strong indicator that a tumor is shrinking in size.
The MAD aims to provide increased flexibility and palatability, with a 1:1 ratio of fat to carbohydrates and protein, and contains around 65% fat, 25% protein, and 10% carbohydrate (Payne et al., 2018). Fat is encouraged and the carbohydrate intake is limited to 10–20 g/day in children and 15–20 g/day in adults (Kossoff, 2004; Kossoff and Dorward, 2008). Because of carbohydrate restriction, the MAD can also produce urinary ketones (Carrette et al., 2008). The MAD does not require weighing food on a gram scale, or restriction of calories, protein or liquids, and may be a good option for patients who are unable to tolerate a more restrictive diet such as the classical ketogenic diet (KD) (Cervenka et al., 2012). Low-carbohydrate multivitamin and calcium carbonate supplementation is recommended in the MAD (Kossoff et al., 2009).
Contemporary researchers like Dr. Thomas Seyfried and Dominic D’Agostino have argued that this dysregulated cellular energy production, or cellular metabolism, is actually what induces malignancy and that by extension, if we limit the fuels available for this process of fermentation, and the fuels are glucose, which is derived from carbohydrate in the diet, and glutamine, which is derived from protein in the diet, then we can actually starve cancer cells and either improve the results of conventional treatment or perhaps even address some cancers independently without conventional treatment.
They also noted that some patients were more responsive to the ketogenic diet than other patients were. The best response was in a 3-year-old girl who had complete remission five years of treatment with a ketogenic diet. Two other patients also experienced complete remission after the diet, and the other two patients had disease progression after stopping keto. (Keep in mind, however, that all of these patients used conventional treatments along with the keto diet.)
We have a dedicated dietitian who provides patients with individualized nutrition education, meal planning and resources, as well as recipes including some for ketogenic-friendly breads and desserts. Cooking classes and demonstrations for patients are also currently under development. Patients on dietary therapy will be closely monitored by a neurologist, Dr. Elizabeth Felton, who was trained in adult dietary therapy at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

In order to be successful, this therapy calls for strict compliance and plenty of patience, especially in the beginning. Most important, patients with epilepsy should only use the diet with the support of a knowledgeable ketogenic diet team, including a doctor and a licensed dietitian who can correctly calculate and monitor the diet for each individual.
To the surprise of these investigators – at the time no Western scientist believed any human could survive on nothing but meat – this Eskimo diet consisted of virtually 100% animal products, 80% in the form of fat, with much of it saturated, 20% protein, but essentially no carbohydrates. From cradle to grave these traditional Eskimos lived in a state of ketosis.
Cyclical ketosis means you’re sometimes in ketosis and sometimes aren’t. A few days each week—the night before workout days to build glycogen stores in your muscles—try increasing your intake of berries, higher complex carb veggies (like sweet potatoes), and non-gluten grains. It might knock you out of ketosis temporarily, but it also provides a wealth of nutrients to keep you lean, healthy, and happy. This is also called flexible ketosis, which creates metabolic flexibility—the holy grail of metabolism management. I’ve also talked about cycling ketosis with intermittent fasting, which provides a win-win strategy to reach your health goals.
During the 1920s and 1930s, when the only anticonvulsant drugs were the sedative bromides (discovered 1857) and phenobarbital (1912), the ketogenic diet was widely used and studied. This changed in 1938 when H. Houston Merritt, Jr. and Tracy Putnam discovered phenytoin (Dilantin), and the focus of research shifted to discovering new drugs. With the introduction of sodium valproate in the 1970s, drugs were available to neurologists that were effective across a broad range of epileptic syndromes and seizure types. The use of the ketogenic diet, by this time restricted to difficult cases such as Lennox–Gastaut syndrome, declined further.[10]
If you’ve decided to move forward in trying the keto diet, you will want to stick to the parameters of the eating plan. Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your calories will come from fats. That means you’ll eat meats, fats, and oils, and a very limited amount of nonstarchy vegetables, she says. (This is different from a traditional low-carb diet, as even fewer carbs are allowed on the keto diet.)
It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.
A lot of people take their macros as a “set in stone” type of thing. You shouldn’t worry about hitting the mark every single day to the dot. If you’re a few calories over some days, a few calories under on others – it’s fine. Everything will even itself out in the end. It’s all about a long term plan that can work for you, and not the other way around.
I think it was still hard for him to accept that many cancer patients, and many humans without cancer, did best on a plant-based, high carb diet, so foreign to his way of thinking. Though he had heard me expound on the Kelley approach many times over the years, it was to him implausible that humans as a species had adopted to a variety of diets, some high fat, some high carb, some more balanced, and that in medical practice, we as physicians had to be aware that different patients might require completely different diets for optimal health.
The ketogenic diet is a natural, nontoxic metabolic therapy being studied and utilized for cancer prevention and treatment. It works because cancer cells are dependent upon a constant supply of blood sugar (glucose) to stay alive. Normal cells can make energy from both glucose and ketones (metabolic by-products of burning fat), but most cancer cells can only use glucose. Avoiding carbohydrates (starch and sugar) while enjoying delicious and healthy protein and fats will lower blood glucose and increase blood-ketone levels, resulting in a normal body state called nutritional ketosis. Research has shown that nutritional ketosis starves cancer cells while nourishing normal cells and strengthening total body health.

Adverse effects of the dietary interventions were experienced in all studies. The most commonly reported adverse effects were gastrointestinal syndromes. It was common that adverse effects were the reason for participants dropping out of trials (GRADE rating low). Other reasons for dropout included lack of efficacy and non‐acceptance of the diet (GRADE rating low).

The ketogenic diet also has been used in glycogenosis type V (McArdle disease), which is caused by a defect in the muscle-specific isozyme of glycogen phosphorylase. Glycogen phosphorylase is necessary to break down glycogen into free glucose for use as an energy source in muscles. When the ketogenic diet was applied to a patient with this disorder (presumably providing an alternative means of energy production), the patient’s exercise tolerance improved and there was a trend toward decreased baseline creatine kinase levels [22, Class III].
In this way, stem cells allow complex life to exist and continue, providing tissue replacements as needed, appropriate for the tissue in which they live. That is, liver stem cells will create new liver cells as needed, bone marrow stem cells will create new bone marrow clones as required, intestinal stem cells will form, as necessary, intestinal lining cells. In this way, the developmental capacity of stem cells seems to be governed by the local environment.

Usually when the classic ketogenic diet is prescribed, the total calories are matched to the number of calories the person needs. For example, if a child is eating a 1500 calorie regular diet, it would be changed to a 1500 calorie ketogenic diet. For very young children only, the diet may be prescribed based on weight, for example 75 to 100 calories for each kilogram (2.2 pounds) of body weight. If it sounds complicated, it is! That’s why people need a dietician’s help when using this diet.


The cancer industry is probably the most prosperous business in the United States. In 2014, there will be an estimated 1,665,540 new cancer cases diagnosed and 585,720 cancer deaths in the US. $6 billion of tax-payer funds are cycled through various federal agencies for cancer research, such as the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The NCI states that the medical costs of cancer care are $125 billion, with a projected 39 percent increase to $173 billion by 2020.
Research here is conflicting. While you might think reducing insulin-triggering carbohydrate foods would improve insulin sensitivity, that isn’t always the case. Rodent studies found at least in the short-term, ketogenic diets increased glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Researchers speculate part of this insulin resistance occurs because of keto-adaptation, and once your body adjusts to ketosis, you become more insulin sensitive. Your mileage will vary, of course, and I believe going too low-carb could create these and other potential dangers.

This book is an excellent source for those who want to know much of the details about a Ketogenic diet for cancer but who need it succinctly. Miriam Kalamian's book has more detail, but I have had friends tell me it was more than they wanted to know. For those people Ellen Davis's book would be best. There were some things I learned from Davis that I did not learn from Kalamian. The only problem with Davis is that there is NO INDEX. That means if you want to go back to something you remember, you have no quick and easy way to find it. Because of that I wound up reading it 3 times, each of which had value. However, I would have appreciated an index. But the book has so much that I did not want to take away a star. When I find something of value in a book, I mark it up. My copy has marks all over.

The ketogenic diet exerts anticancer effects by inducing a metabolic shift in malignant tissues that promotes apoptosis (self-programmed death) of cancer cells, inhibiting angiogenesis (the growth of new tumor-supporting blood vessels), reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, suppressing mTOR (a protein in humans involved in the regulation of cell growth and regeneration), and increasing the sensitivity of certain cancer cell types to chemotherapy. (38)
Cardiovascular Disease – A ketogenic diet is often feared because of its high dependence on dietary fat for energy. This misguided fear is based on the outdated notion that eating fat negatively affects cardiovascular health, in particular, blood lipids. On the contrary, a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet may actually improve blood lipid profiles, including decreased triglycerides and total and LDL cholesterol, and increased HDL cholesterol.39 40 41 A ketogenic diet might also alter the size and volume of the different LDL particles in a beneficial way, shifting from small, dense particles (believed to be atherogenic) to large, fluffy particles. 42 (See the Natural Grocers Customer Literature File Fats— Saturated for more information)
Hi Gigi, Low carb and keto is about the balance of macronutrients eaten (fat, protein and carbs), not specifically meat or lack thereof. Most people on keto do eat meat, though some people do vegetarian keto. Fat is actually necessary for many body processes. There is no issue for the kidneys with a high fat diet, but if you eat too much protein that isn’t great for the kidneys. It’s a common misconception that keto is high protein (it isn’t). Keto is great for diabetics as it naturally helps stabilize insulin. All of this being said, please know I’m not a doctor and you should consult your doctor on any medical questions or before starting any diet. If you have more questions that aren’t medical questions, I recommend our low carb & keto support group here.
A randomised, controlled clinical trial among 120 overweight adults with high levels of cholesterol compared the effects of a ketogenic diet against a low-fat diet. After 24 weeks, the group following the keto diet reported greater weight loss and declines in the triglyceride levels and higher increases in the HDL cholesterol levels compared to the low-fat group (11).
[29:44] – There is increasing evidence for what Dave likes to call, the Alternative Glycogen Store Theory. Do leaner, athletic types of individuals seem to be more likely to be hyper-responders, in particular those with lower levels of triglycerides and high levels of LDL-C and LDL-P? Gary mentions Dr William Davis, from Wheat Belly, post on Lp(a) traits.
Perhaps the first person to really put ketogenic diets on the map was Dr. Robert C. Atkins, a cantankerous medical doctor who began experimenting with a low-carb diet in 1963. His first book, Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution, was published in 1972. Dr. Atkins died in 2003 from a tragic fall (interestingly, the Atkins website’s timeline does not mention his death), but his diet plan lives on today.

Jimmy Moore: Quite frankly. They’ve not been trained to teach you how to do nutrition, and then if they turn to nutrition they either leave it to the dietitian who has been trained in low fat, high carb diets or they’ll just “Well, the USDA my plate says blah blah blah.” They’re just parading what someone else has said. They’ve not done their own research. Just assuming that your doctor knows everything about what it takes nutritionally to make you healthy is a bad mistake.
For cells to maintain a healthy status, oxidants and antioxidants have to be in balance with each other. When this equilibrium is tilted toward an oxidized state, it leads to oxidative stress, in which an excess of oxidants can damage cellular structures and affect the health of the cell. Even cancer cells need to safeguard themselves against this.

To date, evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials is lacking, but needed, to answer the question of whether an adjuvant KD would benefit specific cancer patients. Human data pertaining to KDs and cancer are mostly based on single case reports and a smattering of preliminary clinical studies with small study cohorts, heterogenous study designs, poor compliance to the diet, noncomparable regimens, or without standardized dietary guidance. Even so, results of the first clinical studies support the hypothesis of an anti-tumor effect of KDs. For example, 10 of the 24 (42%) clinical studies included in a recent review [1] provide evidence for the anti-tumor effect of KDs, whereas seven (29%) showed no effect and only one study reported a pro-tumor effect of the KD. The currently available medical literature presents strong scientific evidence for the safe application of a KD only in patients with glioblastoma. However, a clear recommendation for adjuvant use of the KD in glioblastoma patients still requires results from ongoing randomized controlled clinical trials.
The ketogenic diet, or even just a higher-fat, low-carb diet, has now gained massive support as a modern-day healing strategy. In fact, our ideas about fats and cholesterol seem to have been almost completely reversed in recent years. That being said, many people see their cholesterol go up after beginning more of a ketogenic lifestyle. Some people get concerned when this happens, so in this article, I am going to address the phenomena of high cholesterol on a ketogenic diet.
The ketogenic diet has been shown in many studies to be particularly helpful for some epilepsy conditions. These include infantile spasms, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, and GLUT-1 deficiency. Using a formula-only ketogenic diet for infants and gastrostomy-tube fed children may lead to better compliance and possibly even improved efficacy.

2. The Medium-Chain Triglycerides (MCT) diet has been used since the 1970s. It uses MCT oil to replace the long-chain fatty acids of the traditional ketogenic diet . As MCT oil is highly ketogenic, this allows for more carbohydrates. In a randomized controlled prospective study from London in 2008, the investigators compared the MCT diet to the traditional ketogenic diet. They found that although the traditional ketogenic diet led to higher serum ketone levels, fatigue, and mineral deficiencies, there was no difference in growth, efficacy and overall tolerability .
The low glycaemic index treatment (LGIT)[49] is an attempt to achieve the stable blood glucose levels seen in children on the classic ketogenic diet while using a much less restrictive regimen. The hypothesis is that stable blood glucose may be one of the mechanisms of action involved in the ketogenic diet,[9] which occurs because the absorption of the limited carbohydrates is slowed by the high fat content.[5] Although it is also a high-fat diet (with approximately 60% calories from fat),[5] the LGIT allows more carbohydrate than either the classic ketogenic diet or the modified Atkins diet, approximately 40–60 g per day.[18] However, the types of carbohydrates consumed are restricted to those that have a glycaemic index lower than 50. Like the modified Atkins diet, the LGIT is initiated and maintained at outpatient clinics and does not require precise weighing of food or intensive dietitian support. Both are offered at most centres that run ketogenic diet programmes, and in some centres they are often the primary dietary therapy for adolescents.[9]
The ketogenic diet’s origin dates back to the 1920s when doctors began using it to control seizures among patients with epilepsy. The history of the ketogetnic diet began with a nutritional plan made of carbohydrates (carbs), fat, and protein forces the body to use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy. Dubbed ketosis, this process creates two acids in the blood, ketones and decanoic acid, that our bodies and brains use for fuel.

Basically, carbohydrates are the primary source of energy production in body tissues. When the body is deprived of carbohydrates due to reducing intake to less than 50g per day, insulin secretion is significantly reduced and the body enters a catabolic state. Glycogen stores deplete, forcing the body to go through certain metabolic changes. Two metabolic processes come into action when there is low carbohydrate availability in body tissues: gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis.[4][5]
Aggressive tumors typically demonstrate a high glycolytic rate, which results in resistance to radiation therapy and cancer progression via several molecular and physiologic mechanisms. Intriguingly, many of these mechanisms utilize the same molecular pathways that are altered through calorie and/or carbohydrate restriction. Furthermore, poorer prognosis in cancer patients who display a glycolytic phenotype characterized by metabolic alterations, such as obesity and diabetes, is now well established, providing another link between metabolic pathways and cancer progression. We review the possible roles for calorie restriction (CR) and very low carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KDs) in modulating the five R’s of radiotherapy to improve the therapeutic window between tumor control and normal tissue complication probability. Important mechanisms we discuss include (1) improved DNA repair in normal, but not tumor cells; (2) inhibition of tumor cell repopulation through modulation of the PI3K–Akt–mTORC1 pathway downstream of insulin and IGF1; (3) redistribution of normal cells into more radioresistant phases of the cell cycle; (4) normalization of the tumor vasculature by targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1α downstream of the PI3K–Akt–mTOR pathway; (5) increasing the intrinsic radioresistance of normal cells through ketone bodies but decreasing that of tumor cells by targeting glycolysis. These mechanisms are discussed in the framework of animal and human studies, taking into account the commonalities and differences between CR and KDs. We conclude that CR and KDs may act synergistically with radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer patients and provide some guidelines for implementing these dietary interventions into clinical practice.
A lifestyle of fasting may involve an individual eating for a period of only 4-8 hours in one day. A 20-hour fast may involve eating food between 3pm and 7pm each day. This regular intermittent fasting lifestyle allows the body to produce ketones in order to fuel the entire body. The 20-hour fast may be optimal for individuals with the diagnosis of cancer, but may otherwise be incorporated into your lifestyle using a 16 to 18 hour fasting period.
Though she returned to her primary care physician repeatedly, he dismissed her complaints as “nerves,” suggesting only a tranquilizer. Eventually, in 1975 she developed a palpable mass the size of a grapefruit in her pelvis, thought by her doctors – finally taking her seriously – to be an indication of obvious recurrent disease. A chest x-ray at the time revealed multiple nodules in both lungs, consistent with widely metastatic cancer.

Because epilepsy is a metabolic disease (Clanton et al., 2017), interest in studies of alterations of metabolism by anticonvulsants such as the KD has increased, as has their importance for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy. This contribution reviews the use and effects of the KD and its variants for the treatment of adults and children with intractable epilepsy.


Let me say out front I have no problem with scientists who propose a theory, in short papers or in the case of Dr. Seyfried, in long, detailed books. I do have a problem when scientists go a step further, insisting in the absence of any significant human data or even impressive case histories they have unraveled the mystery of cancer. I am also quite surprised, in the case of Dr. Seyfried, that both alternative and conventional practitioners have risen up in a loud chorus of enthusiasm, as if indeed Dr. Seyfried’s theories are correct, and that he has solved the cancer riddle.


Jimmy Moore: I wouldn’t fret so much about the blood sugar, I would definitely keep an eye on insulin. Unfortunately there’s just not an easy way to prick your finger and check insulin at home. It doesn’t exist yet. It’s coming real soon. It’s not available yet. I think the big take home is relax, chill out, you’re doing good for your body, especially like we talked about with the cholesterol numbers. If that HDL is going up, if the triglycerides are going down, the small LDL particles are going down, your HSCRP is under 1, why are you worried?
Unknown to most, even within the alternative world, my friend Bob Atkins tried the ketogenic diet for some 12 years on many of his cancer patients, with no significant success as he reported to me. As a telling point, under the name “Dr. Robert Atkins” on Amazon, one will find dozens of books he authored including his original diet book, its many incarnations and editions, along with books on vitamins, minerals – but glaringly absent, no book on cancer. Yes, the ketogenic diet has been tried before, with cancer patients, and without success.
There are actually two kinds of LDL particles (typically called “patterns”). Pattern A LDL is large, “fluffy,” and buoyant. Pattern B LDL is small and dense. Pattern B LDL proteins tend to get stuck in the nooks and crannies of blood vessels (arteries, especially). These are the primary culprit for “clogged arteries.” Pattern A LDL proteins are too big to get stuck in blood vessels.
3. The Low Glycemic Index Treatment (LGIT, uses a liberalized but still low carbohydrate intake, with carbohydrates supplied only in the form of low-glycemic index foods (glycemic index of less than 50 relative to glucose). Of the 20 patients initially studied on this diet in 2005, 10 experienced a greater than 90% reduction in seizure frequency. The LGIT can be started as an outpatient without a fasting period. An updated study in 2009 included 76 children, of which 50% of those remaining on the diet at 3 months had a >50% seizure reduction.

In fact, once all our our reserved glucose/glycogen runs out after several days on a low-carb, keto diet, our bodies create compounds called ketone bodies (or ketones) from our own stored body fat, as well as from fats in our diet. In addition, researchers have discovered that ketones contain main benefits, such as fat loss, suppressing our appetites, boosting mental clarity and lowering the risk for a number of chronic diseases.
• Your body is still growing — In one study, epileptic children experienced a reduction in symptoms and improved cognitive performance when a ketogenic diet was introduced.49 However, this may have a negative effect on the growth of their bodies in the long run, according to a study published in the journal Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology.50
In some ways, it’s similar to the Atkins diet, which similarly boosts the body’s fat-burning abilities through eating only low-carb foods, along with getting rid of foods high in carbs and sugar. Removing glucose from carbohydrate foods will cause the body to burn fat for energy instead. The major differences between the classic keto and the Atkins diet is the former emphasizes healthier keto fats, less overall protein and no processed meat (such as bacon) while having more research to back up its efficacy.
The theory of ketogenic diets for cancer does not rest on depriving the tumor of glucose since, as you say, blood glucose is regulated (not from fat, though — except for a small amount from glycerol and other minor exceptions, you can’t make glucose from fat). In addition many tumors will overexpress the glucose receptors. The logic rests with regulating insulin and providing alternative fuel as ketone bodies. Remember, glucose — really most nutrients — have control effects as well being fuels. So the goal is to repress the utilization of glucose by inhibition with derivatives of fat and ketone bodies (acetyl-CoA, for example).

“For me, the focus is on optimizing nutrition, and on nutritional interventions as part of the therapy for chronic diseases,” he said. “Depriving the body of access to any major macronutrient changes metabolism and invariably has a negative impact on health. The best nutritional intervention for weight loss is a caloric-restricted, portion-controlled, well-balanced meal plan.”
The keto diet works by eliminating carbohydrates from the your daily intake and keeping the body’s carbohydrate stores almost empty, therefore preventing too much insulin from being released following food consumption and creating normal blood sugar levels. This can help reverse “insulin resistance,” which is the underlying problem contributing to diabetes symptoms. In studies, low-carb diets have shown benefits for improving blood pressure, postprandial glycemia and insulin secretion. (7)
Ketogenic diets (some using calorie restriction) have been associated with decreased tumor growth in animal models of gliomas [10], prostate cancer [25], and gastric cancer [11]. In the context of cancer, ketone bodies may provide an alternative substrate for ATP production in malignant cells, as outlined above. However, other work suggests that glucose is used to produce components critical to proliferative cell growth [26], and it is conceivable that the ketogenic diet may restrict that aspect of malignant cell transformation.
In terms of weight loss, you may be interested in trying the ketogenic diet because you’ve heard that it can make a big impact right away. And that’s true. “Ketogenic diets will cause you to lose weight within the first week,” says Mattinson. She explains that your body will first use up all of its glycogen stores (the storage form of carbohydrate). With depleted glycogen, you’ll drop water weight. While it can be motivating to see the number on the scale go down (often dramatically), do keep in mind that most of this is water loss initially.
Net carbs is simply total carbs minus fiber and non-digestible sugar alcohols, like erythritol. (This doesn’t apply to high glycemic sugar alcohols, like maltitol.) We don’t have to count fiber and certain sugar alcohols in net carbs, because they either don’t get broken down by our bodies, are not absorbed, or are absorbed but not metabolized. (Read more about sugar alcohols here.)
I’ve been Keto for over a year now. I’ve lost 60 lbs. I’m off Metformin for type 2 diabetic and my LDL has improved significantly. In my experience, Keto will show some quick results in some but for others it will take longer. It depends on how long you’ve been on the standard American diet. It will take time for your body to fix “self-heal”. Not everyone will have the same results in the same amount of time.
You’re transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you’re having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
If you have a history of hypothyroid issues, you may also struggle with unhealthy cholesterol levels as well — and the keto diet can make them even worse. However, for those of you who are being treated for your hypothyroid condition or who have an autoimmune thyroid condition, you may be able to follow the keto diet without any problems. In fact, many keto dieters with autoimmune thyroid conditions have found that the keto way of eating improved their quality of life more than any other diet.
First of all, myeloma patients, even when diagnosed with an aggressive form, often linger for years before the disease advances. I would never have included such a two-year survivor in One Man Alone, or in any other book I have written or plan to write – unless, possibly, there has been documented significant regression of disease, not apparent in this case. I do include a case of multiple myeloma treated by Dr. Kelley in my monograph, a woman diagnosed with extensive cancer throughout her skeleton with evidence of multiple fractures.
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The oxygen-free pathway used by cancer cells needs a lot more glucose to produce the same amount of energy as an oxygen-using cell. This realization led to imaging techniques where cancer cells can be detected by spotting where large amounts of a glucose tracer accumulate in the body. The glucose used in this technique contains a small amount of radioactive material that lights up in the image.
Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, PhD, RD, , Mary Dean Coleman, PhD, RD, Joanne J. Volpe, Kathy W. Hosig, PhD, MPH, RD, “Perceived Hunger Is Lower and Weight Loss Is Greater in Overweight Premenopausal Women Consuming a Low-Carbohydrate/High-Protein vs High-Carbohydrate/Low-Fat Diet,” The Journal of Pediatrics: Vol 105, Issue 9: 1433–1437; September 2005. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000282230501151X.
Throughout his talks, both here and elsewhere, Dr. Seyfried presents mouse studies that are interesting and suggestive that there might be something to this whole ketogenic diet thing, at least in brain tumors, such as this one. However, this is what we in the oncology biz would call pretty preliminary data, worthy of further investigation but not supporting the grandiose claims that Dr. Seyfried makes.
If I were you I wouldn’t worry about that. I would just be glad that the word is getting out on combatting cancer. The rewards of spreading good helpful lifechanging knowledge are far greater than anything money can buy. Problems have always followed the attitude of profiteering vs benefitting all who need help. Pay it forward, pass it on, and Live!
I want you to meet my daughter Alina. She was a bright 28-year-old college graduate. She was working as an accountant for CA. She was happy, successful, a picture of health. She had occasional headaches, but the doctors didn’t seem concerned. In September of 2016, we ended up in the emergency room. The doctors found a massive brain tumor. Alina had two surgeries to remove the tumor followed by the devastating news that she had stage 4 glioblastoma, otherwise known as GBM. GBM has been in the news recently because of senator McCain. It is an aggressive, fast-growing brain cancer. The average survival time is 12 months. 25% of patients survive one year, and 5% survive five years.
"It's called ketogenic metabolic therapy," and he says in this context, "the ketogenic diet shouldn't be considered a diet like green salads or other such stuff. It's essentially medicine, and the process primarily tries to remove one of the driving fuels for the disease, which is glucose, and transition the whole body over to ketones, which the tumor cells can't use as a fuel."
Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits.1There are scientifically-backed studies that show the advantage of a low-carb, ketogenic diet over a low-fat diet. One meta-analysis of low-carbohydrate diets showed a large advantage in weight loss. The New England Journal of Medicine study resulted in almost double the weight loss in a long-term study on ketone inducing diets.
Cholesterol is most commonly transported in the blood by molecules composed of fat and protein called lipoproteins. From least dense to most dense, they come in five forms: chylomicrons, very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Because VLDL, LDL, and HDL cholesterol are frequently used as clinical indicators, we are going to focus on them.
Chapter 6 continues with advice on customizing the diet, foods that are allowed or disallowed, meal preparation, and how to follow the diet when away from home, such as restaurant or travel dining. Chapter 7 presents a number of diverse topics of great practical importance especially to a cancer patient but seldom mentioned in popular diet books: alcohol consumption: how to handle incidental illnesses; sick days and menstrual cycles; stress; exercise; acidity and alkalinity; and vegetarianism. Finally there are 12 appendices that provide convenient worksheets and a wealth of advice and information that will save many telephone calls, and trips to the library or internet.
https://draxe.com/about-dr-josh-axe/ Here are Dr Axe’s credentials. We in the UK know him from when he came to UK with the USA Olympic team for the 2012 London Olympics. He is a musco-skeleton specialist, but he has studied nutrition to functional medicine Doctor level, so knows what he is talking about when discussing diet/nutrition – as he does for USA athletes. Many GP type Doctors will tell you that they do only a few hours in their years of Medical training on diet and nutrition – I know as I was given totally useless diet information from my own Doctor when I was diagnosed diabetic 5 years ago. I got worse until I looked up functional medicine practitioners in USA like Dr Axe and diabetic specialist Dr Brian Mowll. I resolved my bleeding retina, neuropathy starting in my feet and have no need for the usual medications they needlessly push type 2 diabetics on. My Doctor was annoyed and thought I was crazy back then, but how he directs me to the diabetic clinic nurse and I tell her about how to do this low carb.ketogenic diet and she, also diabetic, has started on it and wants me to come to clinic classes to tell others.
Jimmy Moore: My mamma would kill me if she know I did that. I had four root canals and then I also had some mercury amalgams that were put in way back, twenty years ago when I was in my early twenties. Anyway, I determined I bet that’s a big reason why my cholesterol has always been high since I’ve been adult. I got that taken care of the year that I wrote Cholesterol Clarity in 2013, and I got it tested my total cholesterol was over 400. Got it tested again in October, total cholesterol had dropped over 100 points.
As you might suspect, this metabolic theory of cancers is controversial in the mainstream cancer paradigm, but there’s already promising initial evidence to support it, and most traditional cancer specialists concede that this metabolic theory has merit, and it may be a piece of the puzzle. I would say that the dominant paradigm idea right now is that metabolic dysfunction is likely one of the pieces of the puzzle, but that cancer is multifactorial and probably does involve genetic mutations that may be independent of metabolic dysfunction and that there are other causes that may not be directly related to metabolic dysfunction.
A computer program such as KetoCalculator may be used to help generate recipes.[47] The meals often have four components: heavy whipping cream, a protein-rich food (typically meat), a fruit or vegetable and a fat such as butter, vegetable oil, or mayonnaise. Only low-carbohydrate fruits and vegetables are allowed, which excludes bananas, potatoes, peas, and corn. Suitable fruits are divided into two groups based on the amount of carbohydrate they contain, and vegetables are similarly divided into two groups. Foods within each of these four groups may be freely substituted to allow for variation without needing to recalculate portion sizes. For example, cooked broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and green beans are all equivalent. Fresh, canned, or frozen foods are equivalent, but raw and cooked vegetables differ, and processed foods are an additional complication. Parents are required to be precise when measuring food quantities on an electronic scale accurate to 1 g. The child must eat the whole meal and cannot have extra portions; any snacks must be incorporated into the meal plan. A small amount of MCT oil may be used to help with constipation or to increase ketosis.[37]
But no fear, there’s always a new miracle around the corner, and in 1998 the newspaper reporters and TV newscasters, having effortlessly drifted away from interferon and interleukin-2 and the bone marrow transplant craze, were all in a tizzy over the newest “final” solution to cancer, anti-angiogenesis, based on the pioneering work of the late Dr. Judah Folkman of Harvard. Dr. Folkman had spent decades studying the process of angiogenesis in cancer tissues, the formation of new blood vessels that allow tumors to grow quickly and invade through normal tissues and organs with deadly effect.
“Because cancer cells prefer to use glucose, diets that limit glucose may be beneficial,” Barbara Gower, PhD, senior author and professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences, said in a statement. “Because they limit glucose and several growth factors, ketogenic diets will limit the ability of cancer to grow, which gives the patient’s immune system time to respond.”
Editors responded with disbelief, claiming the results couldn’t be real since a non-toxic nutritional therapy could never be useful against advanced cancer. I found the logic, “it couldn’t be true because it couldn’t be true” perplexing, for editors of scientific journals. In any event, the book would finally be published, in a rewritten and updated form, in 2010.
While KD and MAD have demonstrated efficacy in reducing the extent and degree of seizures in epileptic patients, the dietary approaches have been tied to risk of adverse events in both adults and children, although most are treatable and are nearly all  preventable. Adverse effects include constipation, low blood sugar, and gastrointestinal reflux.5,6 Other side effects, such as kidney stones and high cholesterol, can often be improved with supplements or dietary changes.1 These also tend to improve over the long term. Kossoff and colleagues found that both total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol normalized within a year of treatment after initial increases during the first three months of MAD.5
And don’t associate yourself with Ralph Moss, the number one promoter of laetrile quackery and make easily refuted claims such as the claim that “chemo and radiation do not cure cancer or extend life, although cancer physicians often make this claim” and that radiation “often does more harm than good to the patient.” Given that all Dr. Seyfried has is a couple of case studies as clinical support for his treatment (see below) and I can produce reams of studies over nearly 50 years demonstrating that chemotherapy can cure specific cancers and prolong life when used appropriately, the “2% gambit” notwithstanding, it’s not a winning proposition, and it sure doesn’t help your credibility to use the language of cancer quacks to promote your idea.
• Fighting inflammation — The human body can use both sugar and fat as fuel sources. However, the latter is preferred because it is a cleaner, healthier fuel that releases far fewer reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secondary free radicals. By eliminating sugar from your daily food consumption, you're decreasing your risk of developing chronic inflammation throughout your body.
This process of burning fat provides more benefits than simply helping us to shed extra weight — it also helps control the release of hormones like insulin, which plays a role in development of diabetes and other health problems. When we eat carbohydrates, insulin is released as a reaction to elevated blood glucose (an increase in sugar circulating in our blood) and insulin levels rise. Insulin is a “storage hormone” that signals cells to store as much available energy as possible, initially as glycogen (aka stored carbohydrates in our muscles) and then as body fat.

Health Impact News has reported on many of the disease reversing results of the ketogenic (high fat-moderate protein-low carb) diet. Now, a new study is looking at the positive effects of gut bacteria among those following a ketogenic diet for epilepsy. Even though Johns Hopkins used a ketogenic diet for curing epilepsy over 80 years ago, when medical drugs did not help epilepsy effectively, mainstream medicine continues to rely on new and expensive toxic drugs for epileptic children. The “cocktail” combinations of pharmaceutical drugs prescribed often worsens childhood epilepsy. Health Impact News previously published a report on how a four year old child with refractory epilepsy (not treatable with pharmaceutical medications), was treated at the Rochester, Minnesota Mayo Clinic using a ketogenic diet. At first, the child was also kept on pharmaceuticals. The results were poor until he was taken off the medications; then he began healing completely. A new Chinese study on pediatric epileptic cases may even draw the attention of mainstream medical professionals, due to the results seen in children's gut microbiota structure when following a high-fat ketogenic diet.
If I were you I wouldn’t worry about that. I would just be glad that the word is getting out on combatting cancer. The rewards of spreading good helpful lifechanging knowledge are far greater than anything money can buy. Problems have always followed the attitude of profiteering vs benefitting all who need help. Pay it forward, pass it on, and Live!
On the ketogenic diet, carbohydrates are restricted and so cannot provide for all the metabolic needs of the body. Instead, fatty acids are used as the major source of fuel. These are used through fatty-acid oxidation in the cell's mitochondria (the energy-producing parts of the cell). Humans can convert some amino acids into glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis, but cannot do this by using fatty acids.[57] Since amino acids are needed to make proteins, which are essential for growth and repair of body tissues, these cannot be used only to produce glucose. This could pose a problem for the brain, since it is normally fuelled solely by glucose, and most fatty acids do not cross the blood–brain barrier. However, the liver can use long-chain fatty acids to synthesise the three ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone. These ketone bodies enter the brain and partially substitute for blood glucose as a source of energy.[56]
Ketogenic diets (KDs), being high in fat and low in carbohydrates, have been suggested to reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy. At present, such diets are mainly recommended for children who continue to have seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (drug‐resistant epilepsy). Recently, there has been interest in less restrictive KDs, including the modified Atkins diet (MAD), and the use of these diets has extended into adult practice. This is an update of a review first published in 2003 and last updated in 2016.

In the case of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) models, there are data suggesting that calorie restriction itself is protective [31,32••], raising the question of whether manipulations of some critical metabolic pathways also may possess disease-modifying properties. The ketogenic diet originally was designed to mimic fasting, and thus it may regulate a family of proteins known as sirtuins, which play a major role in mediating “anti-aging” effects of calorie restriction [33•]. Alternatively, the ketogenic diet may regulate a master energy-sensing protein in the cell, 5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated kinase [34]. Both proteins have a number of downstream effectors that may possess neuroprotective properties.

Though most of our cells can utilize fatty acids of all stripes via beta oxidation to create ATP energy, our central nervous system is at somewhat of a disadvantage. In fact, long chain fatty acids with 14 or more carbons, which can yield the most ATP from beta oxidation, do not cross the blood-brain barrier. However, in a state of prolonged dietary carbohydrate depletion, the liver begins converting acetyl coenzyme A into various ketone bodies, such as acetoacetate and beta hydroxy butyric acid, which easily penetrate into the brain and which can, like acetyl coenzyme A, be shunted into the citric acid cycle and then the electron transport chain, providing the brain with ATP.

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