If your child is helped by the diet and seizures are better controlled, your child may remain on the ketogenic diet for 2 to 3 years, or longer. The length of time on the diet will be determined by several factors, including how well the diet helps your child, whether your child can be weaned off seizure medications, and your willingness to continue the diet.
There aren’t any studies on control groups living healthy lifestyles, eating a low carb/whole food/meat diet, that shows an increase in cancer. There are 1000’s of examples of blood work showing improvements in LDL ratios (risk of heart disease) and low/steady blood sugar levels (diabetes prevention/treatment). That is actual science. as far as anecdotal evidence, there are many accounts of vegans/vegetarians that have became extremely ill over time due to lack of complete nutrition. It is also more difficult (takes more planning) to ensure you are getting sufficient amounts of calories since plant based is not calorie dense and it takes larger quantities. Additionally, Fats and animal fats especially play a vital role hormone production as well. Look up Dr. Shawn Baker.
“This is an important area of research that has the potential to significantly improve treatment responses,” said AICR’s Director of Research Nigel Brockton, Ph.D. “There are plausible mechanisms by which the ketogenic diet could help make treatment more effective, but, as we see many times, plausibility alone is not enough; it has to be tested. That’s why we are supporting research in this area.”
Our regimen is a modification of the classic ketogenic diet, similar to the Atkins diet. Recent studies have shown that this modified Atkins diet lowers seizure rates in nearly half of adults that try it, usually within a few months. Unlike the ketogenic diet for children, this therapy does not require a hospital stay, an initial fasting period, food weighing, fluid measuring, or calorie counting.

For the latest update we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (11 April 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 11 April 2017), MEDLINE (Ovid, 11 April 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov (11 April 2017) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP, 11 April 2017). We imposed no language restrictions. We checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for additional reports of relevant studies.
More recently, the famed New York diet doctor, Robert Atkins, MD, popularized the ketogenic diet, not for cancer, but as the ultimate weight loss plan with his books over the decades selling in the tens of millions of copies. The original version of the Diet Revolution published in 1972 sold at one point more than 100,000 hard copies a week, in those days the fastest selling book in the history of United States publishing.

Great article! I have been diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolemia, however, I am not concerned at all. I continue to follow a restricted calorie, zero carb ketogenic diet, that I have been doing strictly for the last year and a half. All of my health markers are excellent, except for LDL particle number and total, and it is the large buoyant type. I am middle-aged (46). I did get both a CT scan and tri-vascular scan, and got perfect scores for both. That alleviated any concerns that I might have previously had. Since this diet has improved my gut issues, bodyfat, blood pressure, insulin, blood glucose, mood, energy, A1C, CRP, etc., - basically every single health parameter I have tested, I am sticking with it! Thank you for clearing up the confusion surrounding LDL!
The digestion of carbohydrates (sugar and starch) releases sugar (glucose) into the bloodstream. Greater carb intake results in rising blood sugar and insulin, a pancreatic hormone that manages blood sugar.  Going keto replaces dietary carb with fat and protein. Over time, your cells switch metabolic pathways, and burn stored and dietary fat as a primary energy source instead of sugar. As more fat is burned, some of it is converted into ketone bodies. As blood glucose and insulin levels fall, and ketone levels rise, your muscles (skeletal and heart), use the fats in the bloodstream as fuel, while your brain uses the ketones. The result is more energy, clearer thinking and better health. Ketones are beneficial in many different ways, and being in this metabolic state of "nutritional ketosis" (where blood sugar is low and ketone levels are moderate) has some powerful effects on your metabolism. There is strong research evidence that these metabolic-affecting diets can be used to treat the following medical conditions:
If you have chronic inflammation and/or stress, you may also have persisting high cholesterol levels which, in most cases, isn’t doing anything but causing more problems. The preponderance of this chronic inflammation and stress is typically caused by a variety of lifestyle factors, from eating foods that trigger inflammation to sleeping poorly. [27]
One approach to this question has been to examine the variations in the size of the LDL particles in the blood. With a well-formulated ketogenic diet, we see a shift away from the small dangerous LDL even when the total LDL goes up, so most of this increase is in the ‘good’ or ‘buoyant’ LDL fraction (Hallberg, 2018). Another factor to be taken into account is that during rapid weight loss, cholesterol that you had stored in your adipose tissue (ie, body fat) is mobilized as the fat cells shrink (Phinney 1990). This will artificially raise serum LDL as long as the weight loss continues, but it then comes back down once weight loss stops. To avoid being misled by this, the best strategy is to hold off checking blood lipids until a couple of months after weight loss ceases.
Don’t expect to turn into a muscle-bound. There is unfortunate hype surrounding this diet. There are no magical “ketone” supplements that turn you thin. But studies show it might improve your thinking, help with type 2 diabetes, dementia, seizures and inflammation. Every diet has its detractors. Recent “news” has been particularly harsh with dramatic headlines. Some considered it a “fad.” Others question sustainability. So, are they right?
"The keto diet is primarily used to help reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures in children. While it also has been tried for weight loss, only short-term results have been studied, and the results have been mixed. We don't know if it works in the long term, nor whether it's safe," warns registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital.

The current body of research on metabolic cancer treatments using a keto diet continues to grow. Keto or metabolic cancer therapy is somewhat different than the treatment for other illnesses, and is discussed in detail in my book Fight Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet, which is based on the metabolic therapy research of Dr. Thomas Seyfried  and Dr. Dominic D'Agostino. The main idea behind the use of a ketogenic diet to treat cancer is to starve cancer cells of the sugar and other fuels they need to survive, and to provide support and protection for normal energy processes in healthy cells. The advantage of this treatment protocol is that it is non-toxic to the body, and in "wait and see" cases, it can provide an major health support advantage to the patient. The book was written for the patient and has all the details and research in an easy-to-use format.
In both patients, levels of blood glucose decreased to low/normal levels and ketones increased by 20 to 30 times within seven days of starting the ketogenic diet.  Results from scans indicated that there was a 21.8% decrease in glucose uptake at the tumor sites in both subjects. Lower glucose uptake is a strong indicator that a tumor is shrinking in size.
If any of your numbers are significantly different from what is listed, there may be deeper underlying health issues to be addressed. These are things that can be great to work on with a functional medicine or nutrition practitioner to find the root of your issues. You can get a comprehensive idea of your cholesterol and inflammation levels with our Complete Thyroid Report.

There is no hard evidence that meat itself causes cancer. There is evidence that people who eliminate meat have a slightly lower cancer rate. This can be explain bc people who eliminate meat are usually doing so bc it is perceived to be “healthy” which means they are also eliminating/limiting foods such as coke, junk food, and other highly processed/high in sugar foods. These same people are also more likely to do some type of exercise where as the “meat-eaters” they are comparing them against are eating a highly processed, junk food, standard American diet and are also more likely to smoke and have limited exercise. Correlation is not causation.
Then there are some more experimental drugs that restrict the availability of glucose via inhibition of glycolysis and other processes. One of those drugs is called 2-DG, and that’s shown quite a bit of promise, so there’s not a lot of research on it yet, and then there’s an older drug named DCA, which also limits the availability of glucose. That has shown some promise, although it has known toxicity and side effects. It may not be a good choice for that reason.

Yes you can lose fat on a low carb because it’s just another low calorie diet. How do I know this? I’ve done low carb, (Atkins, etc) high carb, (Slimming Word) moderate carb etc and log my food and was shocked each time to see they were all low calorie. After the initial week or so the rate of fat loss is same as any other diet. It’s calories in calories out. Simple. It’s what some call indirect deficit diet placing silly restriction, rules can eat must eat etc. and of course you lose weight but nothing to do with low carb. It works because it’s a low calorie diet.
It’s a habit to enjoy a brie cheese for desert instead of a piece of chocolate cake but each are favored deserts in France. I’m personally more satisfied after a 350 calorie sized wedge of brie than the same number of calories of cake.. which will give me sugar crash and .. really I’d like two slices of cake(I’ve got a sweet tooth that once I get going it wants to keep being fed)
Dietary treatments for diseases have probably been used for over 2000 years (Yuen and Sander, 2014). Fasting is the only therapeutic measure against epilepsy recorded in the Hippocratic collection. Two Parisian physicians, G Guelpa, and A Marie, recorded the first modern use of starvation as a treatment for epilepsy in 1911 (Wheless, 2008). The modern use of this form of therapy began in the early 1920s (Lima et al., 2014; Yuen and Sander, 2014), when Drs. Stanley Cobb and W.G. Lennox of Harvard at Harvard Medical School observed the effects of starvation as a treatment for epilepsy, noting that seizure improvement typically occurred after 2–3 days (Wheless, 2008). In the same period, Dr. Russel M. Wilder a physician at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, suggested that a specific diet could produce similar benefits to fasting, and proposed a diet that produced ketonemia. He studied a series of patients with epilepsy and demonstrated a result equivalent to fasting and that was maintained for a much longer period. This new concept of diet was designated the “KD.” Peterman, also at the Mayo Clinic, described a composition of the KD similar to that used today (Wilder, 1921).
Leftovers will be another thing we will take into consideration. Not only is it easier on you, but why put yourself through the hassle to cook the same food more than once? Breakfast is something I normally do leftover style, where I don’t have to worry about it in the morning and I certainly don’t have to stress about it. Grab some food out the fridge, pre-made for me, and head out the door. It doesn’t get much easier than that, does it?
Normal dietary fat contains mostly long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are more ketogenic than LCTs because they generate more ketones per unit of energy when metabolised. Their use allows for a diet with a lower proportion of fat and a greater proportion of protein and carbohydrate,[18] leading to more food choices and larger portion sizes.[4] The original MCT diet developed by Peter Huttenlocher in the 1970s derived 60% of its calories from MCT oil.[15] Consuming that quantity of MCT oil caused abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting in some children. A figure of 45% is regarded as a balance between achieving good ketosis and minimising gastrointestinal complaints. The classical and modified MCT ketogenic diets are equally effective and differences in tolerability are not statistically significant.[9] The MCT diet is less popular in the United States; MCT oil is more expensive than other dietary fats and is not covered by insurance companies.[18]
In the absence of glucose, which is normally used by cells as a quick source of energy, the body starts to burn fat and produces ketone bodies instead (it’s why the keto diet is often referred to as the ketone diet). Once ketone levels in the blood rise to a certain point, you enter into a state of ketosis — which usually results in quick and consistent weight loss until you reach a healthy, stable body weight. See this keto diet review, a before and after trying keto for 30 days.
“But if you’re a young and healthy adult, I have no safety concerns about removing carbs,” he adds. “It’s really not a radical concept.” You may experience some short-term issues like bad breath, constipation and flu-like symptoms. (Drinking lots of water can help.) But the lasting benefits could range from reduced hunger and increased energy to weight loss. Some preliminary research even hints at memory improvements.
The ketogenic diet has been studied in at least 14 rodent animal models of seizures. It is protective in many of these models and has a different protection profile than any known anticonvulsant. Conversely, fenofibrate, not used clinically as an antiepileptic, exhibits experimental anticonvulsant properties in adult rats comparable to the ketogenic diet.[58] This, together with studies showing its efficacy in patients who have failed to achieve seizure control on half a dozen drugs, suggests a unique mechanism of action.[56]
A study with an intent-to-treat prospective design was published in 1998 by a team from the Johns Hopkins Hospital[20] and followed-up by a report published in 2001.[21] As with most studies of the ketogenic diet, no control group (patients who did not receive the treatment) was used. The study enrolled 150 children. After three months, 83% of them were still on the diet, 26% had experienced a good reduction in seizures, 31% had had an excellent reduction, and 3% were seizure-free.[Note 7] At 12 months, 55% were still on the diet, 23% had a good response, 20% had an excellent response, and 7% were seizure-free. Those who had discontinued the diet by this stage did so because it was ineffective, too restrictive, or due to illness, and most of those who remained were benefiting from it. The percentage of those still on the diet at two, three, and four years was 39%, 20%, and 12%, respectively. During this period, the most common reason for discontinuing the diet was because the children had become seizure-free or significantly better. At four years, 16% of the original 150 children had a good reduction in seizure frequency, 14% had an excellent reduction, and 13% were seizure-free, though these figures include many who were no longer on the diet. Those remaining on the diet after this duration were typically not seizure-free, but had had an excellent response.[21][22]
Health Impact News has reported on many of the disease reversing results of the ketogenic (high fat-moderate protein-low carb) diet. Now, a new study is looking at the positive effects of gut bacteria among those following a ketogenic diet for epilepsy. Even though Johns Hopkins used a ketogenic diet for curing epilepsy over 80 years ago, when medical drugs did not help epilepsy effectively, mainstream medicine continues to rely on new and expensive toxic drugs for epileptic children. The “cocktail” combinations of pharmaceutical drugs prescribed often worsens childhood epilepsy. Health Impact News previously published a report on how a four year old child with refractory epilepsy (not treatable with pharmaceutical medications), was treated at the Rochester, Minnesota Mayo Clinic using a ketogenic diet. At first, the child was also kept on pharmaceuticals. The results were poor until he was taken off the medications; then he began healing completely. A new Chinese study on pediatric epileptic cases may even draw the attention of mainstream medical professionals, due to the results seen in children's gut microbiota structure when following a high-fat ketogenic diet.
Between 5 and 10 percent of women in the United States have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a disorder characterized by insulin resistance, menstrual irregularities, hyperandrogenism, overweight, and obesity. (15) A ketogenic diet improves fertility in women with PCOS by improving insulin resistance, promoting weight loss, and inducing ovulation. (16)
The ketogenic diet field is moving in the direction of adding vitamins and supplements empirically to the regimen of all children on the ketogenic diet to prevent adverse effects before they occur. Although not mentioned in the 2009 consensus statement, many now advocate for universal treatment with oral citrates, selenium, extra vitamin D, laxatives, and even antacids . Several nutrition companies have created products which are designed for ketogenic diet patients.
In 1921, Rollin Turner Woodyatt reviewed the research on diet and diabetes. He reported that three water-soluble compounds, β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone (known collectively as ketone bodies), were produced by the liver in otherwise healthy people when they were starved or if they consumed a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet.[10] Dr. Russell Morse Wilder, at the Mayo Clinic, built on this research and coined the term "ketogenic diet" to describe a diet that produced a high level of ketone bodies in the blood (ketonemia) through an excess of fat and lack of carbohydrate. Wilder hoped to obtain the benefits of fasting in a dietary therapy that could be maintained indefinitely. His trial on a few epilepsy patients in 1921 was the first use of the ketogenic diet as a treatment for epilepsy.[10]
The precise mechanisms behind the physiological effects of the ketogenic diet and ketones are not fully understood. It is believed that the ketogenic diet is anti-inflammatory, that it decreases free radical production while enhancing production of the body’s own natural anti-oxidants, and it improves metabolic efficiency.8 9 10 11 12 Specific conditions a ketogenic diet may benefit include:
The ketogenic diet is indicated as an adjunctive (additional) treatment in children and young people with drug-resistant epilepsy.[26][27] It is approved by national clinical guidelines in Scotland,[27] England, and Wales[26] and reimbursed by nearly all US insurance companies.[28] Children with a focal lesion (a single point of brain abnormality causing the epilepsy) who would make suitable candidates for surgery are more likely to become seizure-free with surgery than with the ketogenic diet.[9][29] About a third of epilepsy centres that offer the ketogenic diet also offer a dietary therapy to adults. Some clinicians consider the two less restrictive dietary variants—the low glycaemic index treatment and the modified Atkins diet—to be more appropriate for adolescents and adults.[9] A liquid form of the ketogenic diet is particularly easy to prepare for, and well tolerated by, infants on formula and children who are tube-fed.[5][30]

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Kossoff EH, Zupec-Kania BA, Amark PE, Ballaban-Gil KR, Bergqvist AG, Blackford R, et al. Optimal clinical management of children receiving the ketogenic diet: recommendations of the International Ketogenic Diet Study Group. Epilepsia. 2009 Feb;50(2):304–17. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.01765.x. PMID 18823325
The keto diet works by eliminating carbohydrates from the your daily intake and keeping the body’s carbohydrate stores almost empty, therefore preventing too much insulin from being released following food consumption and creating normal blood sugar levels. This can help reverse “insulin resistance,” which is the underlying problem contributing to diabetes symptoms. In studies, low-carb diets have shown benefits for improving blood pressure, postprandial glycemia and insulin secretion. (7)

Fairly recently, the diet was introduced as a weight-loss diet by an Italian professor of surgery, Dr. Gianfranco Cappello of Sapienza University in Rome. In his 2012 study, about 19,000 dieters received a high-fat liquid diet via a feeding tube inserted down the nose. The study showed an average weight loss of more than 20 pounds in participants, most of whom kept it off for at least a year. The researchers reported a few minor side effects, like fatigue.
Cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD): If you find it difficult to stick to a very low-carb diet every day, especially for months on end, you might want to consider a carb-cycling diet instead. Carb cycling increases carbohydrate intake (and sometimes calories in general) only at the right time and in the right amounts, usually about 1–2 times per week (such as on weekends).

Epilepsy is a disabling and common neurological disease, which can be controlled successfully in most patients with one or more antiepileptic drugs. Approximately 30% of patients with epilepsy have refractory epilepsy, that is, have a failure of adequate trials of two tolerated, appropriately chosen and used antiepileptic drug schedules to achieve sustained relief of seizures (Picot et al., 2008; Kwan et al., 2009). Some of these patients are not surgery candidates, so it is necessary to search for alternative treatments for epilepsy such as palliative surgery, neuromodulation, and a ketogenic diet (KD).
If your child is helped by the diet and seizures are better controlled, your child may remain on the ketogenic diet for 2 to 3 years, or longer. The length of time on the diet will be determined by several factors, including how well the diet helps your child, whether your child can be weaned off seizure medications, and your willingness to continue the diet.
The ketogenic diet’s origin dates back to the 1920s when doctors began using it to control seizures among patients with epilepsy. The history of the ketogetnic diet began with a nutritional plan made of carbohydrates (carbs), fat, and protein forces the body to use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy. Dubbed ketosis, this process creates two acids in the blood, ketones and decanoic acid, that our bodies and brains use for fuel.
In both patients, levels of blood glucose decreased to low/normal levels and ketones increased by 20 to 30 times within seven days of starting the ketogenic diet.  Results from scans indicated that there was a 21.8% decrease in glucose uptake at the tumor sites in both subjects. Lower glucose uptake is a strong indicator that a tumor is shrinking in size.
The Keto diet emphasizes weight loss through fat-burning. The goal is to quickly lose weight and ultimately feel fuller with fewer cravings, while boosting your mood, mental focus and energy. According to Keto proponents, by slashing the carbs you consume and instead filling up on fats, you safely enter a state of ketosis. That’s when the body breaks down both dietary and stored body fat into substances called ketones. Your fat-burning system now relies mainly on fat – instead of sugar – for energy. While similar in some ways to familiar low-carb diets, the Keto diet’s extreme carb restrictions – about 20 net carbs a day or less, depending on the version – and the deliberate shift into ketosis are what set this increasingly popular diet apart.
The Modified Atkins diet and modified ketogenic diet (sometimes called 'modified ketogenic therapy') use a high proportion of fats and a strict control of carbohydrates. These are often considered more flexible than the classical or MCT ketogenic diets, as more protein can be eaten, and approximate portion sizes may be used in place of weighed recipes.
[29:44] – There is increasing evidence for what Dave likes to call, the Alternative Glycogen Store Theory. Do leaner, athletic types of individuals seem to be more likely to be hyper-responders, in particular those with lower levels of triglycerides and high levels of LDL-C and LDL-P? Gary mentions Dr William Davis, from Wheat Belly, post on Lp(a) traits.
Sign up 24 hours before the general public and increase your chances of getting a spot. We only open the certification program twice per year. Due to high demand, spots in the program are limited and have historically sold out in a matter of hours. But when you sign up for the presale list, we’ll give you the opportunity to register a full 24 hours before anyone else.

Jimmy Moore: Yeah, just be in control of your own health. That’s the major theme that I’ve tried to push the last couple years. I’m tired of people advocating their responsibility for their own health to a dietitian, to a doctor, there’s just way too many resources. This YouTube channel you’re watching right now is just unbelievable for content, my podcasts, books, there’s all sorts of information that’s out there. A lot of it for free, take advantage of that because I think the more you know the more empowered you can be and whether doctors and dietitians and all these medical professionals like it or not, the empowered patient is the future of healthcare. I think if we’re going to really make a difference in our own lives, and then collectively as a culture in our health, it has to start with the individual caring again.
I’m discouraged to see that nowhere in the article nor in the comments is there a mention of a diet’s best fit to genetics. Consider if someone is an APOE E2 carrier and/or has certain polymorphisms of the APO5 gene. These are quite rare in Okinawa but much more prevalent in the USA (12% of the population). According to a number of well-designed studies, these genetic characteristics point to a higher fat, lower carbohydrate diet as beneficial and even a “moderate” carb diet as problematic.
Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, PhD, RD, , Mary Dean Coleman, PhD, RD, Joanne J. Volpe, Kathy W. Hosig, PhD, MPH, RD, “Perceived Hunger Is Lower and Weight Loss Is Greater in Overweight Premenopausal Women Consuming a Low-Carbohydrate/High-Protein vs High-Carbohydrate/Low-Fat Diet,” The Journal of Pediatrics: Vol 105, Issue 9: 1433–1437; September 2005. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000282230501151X.

Although the ketogenic diet has been around for a long time and may be efficacious in many medical conditions, there is a surprising dearth of long-term studies on its safety. The bulk of the information comes from children using a ketogenic diet for epilepsy. Negative effects seen in children on a ketogenic diet long-term (≥2 years) are poor growth (while on the diet), kidney stones, and dyslipidemia (elevated cholesterol and/or triglycerides). Many of these effects can be overcome with careful attention to mineral intake while on the diet and/or termination of the diet.52 Most long-term studies evaluating adults using a ketogenic diet for weight loss have found very few serious adverse effects.53 54 55 56 However it should be noted that these studies only looked at one year duration on the diet, and poor adherence to the diet was frequently noted as a problem.
1. West, R., Beeri, M. S., Schmeidler, J., Hannigan, C. M., Angelo, G., Grossman, H. T., … Silverman, J. M. (2008). Better memory functioning associated with higher total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in very elderly subjects without the apolipoprotein e4 allele. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, 16(9), 781–5. PMID: 18757771
When you restrict your carbohydrate intake to less than 50 grams daily, you can still fit in plenty of nonstarchy vegetables, maybe some low-glycemic (meaning they don’t bump your blood sugar) blueberries and other berries, and a small amount of non-gluten grains like quinoa (actually a seed and complete protein). But you’ve got very little wiggle room there before you theoretically get knocked out of ketosis.
Leanne: Yeah, it’s really scary and I actually read Good Calories, Bad Calories and did a review on it on YouTube, and going through that whole thing it really paints a really scary picture about how this all came about. It’s really concerning and that’s why I know that you do what you do and I do what I do because we just want to share … this might not be exactly where you want to go with your health and do the research and it’s really great. I know that a lot of doctors, at least in Canada, refuse to do that NMR test.
Hi Jenn, I would not recommend the medication as it is not going to address the root cause of any sort of dysfunction that may be leading to what we are seeing on the lab. When I see elevated cholesterol levels with good Triglyceride:HDL ratios, I most commonly see an underlying thyroid issue with low free T3 levels. I would want to test your thyroid in detail and you may need some additional thyroid hormone support. With very high HDL over 90, I will also see chronic infections and food sensitivities as an issue.
“This is an important area of research that has the potential to significantly improve treatment responses,” said AICR’s Director of Research Nigel Brockton, Ph.D. “There are plausible mechanisms by which the ketogenic diet could help make treatment more effective, but, as we see many times, plausibility alone is not enough; it has to be tested. That’s why we are supporting research in this area.”
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