Despite continuous advances in the medical world, obesity continues to remain a major worldwide health hazard with adult mortality as high as 2.8 million per year. The majority of chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease are largely related to obesity which is usually a product of unhealthy lifestyle and poor dietary habits. Appropriately tailored diet regimens for weight reduction can help manage the obesity epidemic to some extent. One diet regimen that has proven to be very effective for rapid weight loss is a very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat ketogenic diet.[1][2][3]
A well-formulated ketogenic diet, besides limiting carbohydrates, also limits protein intake moderately to less than 1g/lb body weight, unless individuals are performing heavy exercise involving weight training when the protein intake can be increased to 1.5g/lb body weight. This is to prevent the endogenous production of glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. However, it does not restrict fat or overall daily calories. People on a ketogenic diet initially experience rapid weight loss up to 10 lbs in 2 weeks or less. This diet has a diuretic effect, and some early weight loss is due to water weight loss followed by a fat loss. Interestingly with this diet plan, lean body muscle is largely spared. As a nutritional ketosis state sustains, hunger pangs subside, and an overall reduction in caloric intake helps to further weight loss.
As I wrote in my book, “Nevertheless on the therapy [Kelley’s] he slowly began to improve, to the point his mental status normalized and over a period of a year, he progressed from a wheelchair to a walker to a cane.” When I completed my study in 1987, he had survived 5 years and was in excellent health, with no evidence of cancer in his brain or spinal canal.
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This book is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, duplication, adaptation, distribution, and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, a link is provided to the Creative Commons license, and any changes made are indicated.


A study evaluating the effects of a ketogenic diet among 66 obese adults, from which 35 had high cholesterol levels and 31 had normal levels of cholesterol demonstrated that both groups resulted in statistically significant decreased levels of LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides, whereas the HDL cholesterol levels were increased. These results show that keto diet can improve cholesterol levels and ratios of cholesterol levels among obese people regardless of their cholesterol levels before the dietary intervention. Furthermore, this study also demonstrates that low-carb diet is safe to use for a longer period of time in overweight people with a high total cholesterol level and those with normocholesterolemia (18).
If I was diagnosed with cancer or one of my relatives or friends were diagnosed, I would certainly put the ketogenic diet and fasting at the top of the list of potential treatments to investigate because I see a high potential for benefit and very little downside. You can’t say that about many cancer therapies. As we talked about earlier, the goal with cancer treatment is to find something that inhibits the growth of cancer cells but doesn’t damage healthy cells. Again, there just aren’t that many therapies out there that do that.
In another parallel experiment the mice used did not have cancer at the start, but were bred to have a genetic predisposition toward breast cancer. Almost half of these mice, when fed on the Western diet, showed cancer within the first year (the average life span of these mice is two years). Only one of the mice in this group reached its normal life expectancy, and 70% ultimately died of cancer. Of the group on the ketogenic diet, only 30% ever developed cancer, and over half reached their normal life expectancy or exceeded it.
Hey David, You will definitely want to do everything you can to mitigate the mold issue. If you cannot remove it from your environment (or yourself from that environment) then you will want to use things like glutathione, liver support, activated charcoal, and daily detoxification strategies as much as possible. For the LDL testing, this is one of the best I know of https://drjockers.com/cardiopower-testing/
For patients interested in Ketogenic diet, it is vitally important that you talk with your health-care providers, says Alice Bender, MS, RDN, AICR’s Director of Nutrition Programs. “A dietitian is best positioned to talk with you about what is known regarding the pros and cons – especially to learn if this diet has any research showing the reasonable application with your particular type of cancer and if the ketogenic diet may even be harmful for you.”
Taken together, results from preclinical studies, albeit sometimes contradictory, tend to support an anti-tumor effect rather than a pro-tumor effect of the KD for most solid cancers. However, even though pro-tumor effects are rare, they cannot be ruled out per se. Most importantly, available preclinical evidence implies that the feasibility of a KD as an adjuvant cancer therapy strongly depends on the type of tumor and its genetic alterations.
A systematic review in 2018 looked at 16 studies on the ketogenic diet in adults. It concluded that the treatment was becoming more popular for that group of patients, that the efficacy in adults was similar to children, the side effects relatively mild. However, many patients gave up with the diet, for various reasons, and the quality of evidence was inferior to studies on children. Health issues include high levels of low-density lipoprotein, high total cholesterol, and weight loss.[24]
A ketogenic diet promotes healing of the brain following TBI by increasing the activity of genes genes involved in energy metabolism, stimulating the generation of new mitochondria, and inhibiting the production of damaging reactive oxygen species in the brain. (24) In animal models of TBI, a ketogenic diet reduces cerebral edema and neuronal cell death while improving behavioral outcomes. (25, 26) While individual success stories of people using a ketogenic diet for TBI are easy to find on the internet, formal clinical trials are still needed.

These affect your brain and spine, as well as the nerves that link them together. Epilepsy is one, but others may be helped by a ketogenic diet as well, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and sleep disorders. Scientists aren’t sure why, but it may be that the ketones your body makes when it breaks down fat for energy help protect your brain cells from damage.


Kossoff et al. (2018) proposed that dietary therapy should be considered earlier as an option for treatment of intractable epilepsy, because of its proven efficacy, the poor chance of improvement with further anticonvulsant administration, and the possibility of using the MAD (Kossoff et al., 2006) and low-glycemic-index treatment (LGIT) (Pfeifer and Thiele, 2005), which are easier to manage in adults.

We’re going full on fats with breakfast, just like we did last week. This time we’ll double the amount of ketoproof coffee (or tea) we drink, meaning we double the amount of coconut oil, butter, and heavy cream. It should come to quite a lot of calories, and should definitely keep us full all the way to dinner. Remember to continue drinking water like a fiend to make sure you’re staying hydrated.
Data on the efficacy of KD and the modified Atkin’s diet (MAD) in children and adults are similar.1 “Approximately one-third of adults with epilepsy that does not respond to medications may have a 50% seizure frequency reduction. Five to 10% of these adults may have a dramatic response, with greater than or equal to 90% seizure frequency reduction. This is similar to the response seen in children,” said Klein.
Animal proteins (meat, fish, etc.) have very little, if any, carbs. You can consume them in moderate amounts as needed to control hunger. Overall, choose fattier cuts of meat rather than leaner ones. For example, chicken thighs and legs are preferable to chicken breasts because they contain much more fat. We’ve got quick keto diet chicken recipes to help.
Note: Are you a vegetarian or vegan and want to go on a ketogenic diet? It’s still possible! Just keep in mind that the dietary restrictions can sometimes be a little bit intense. Make sure to plan ahead and prepare to aid your success. To help out, we’ve published articles (with 7 day meal plans included) for both the vegetarian ketogenic diet and the vegan ketogenic diet.
Jimmy Moore: 300 is the normal. Yes. That’s 100 points higher than authorities today would say is “normal”. Yet if they put them on cholesterol lowering medication, do you know they would have been at greater risk for heart disease if they took that pill then they’re total cholesterol being 300. I think it all circles back around to it’s not about the cholesterol people, it really is about the inflammation.

Fight Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet is not an academic exercise in what a ketogenic rendition of an anticancer diet should be. The information is firmly based on the science and research of Dr. Thomas Seyfried, who proposes that cancer is a metabolic disease, and on consultation with both Drs. Seyfried and Dominic D’Agostino on design and implementation of a ketogenic diet. Sound biochemical and physiological sciences support the book’s explanations and recommendations.

A ketogenic diet typically leads to a broad range of improvements in blood lipids as well as other cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure and inflammation. However, the changes we see in total and LDL cholesterol levels are much less predictable than the changes in other blood lipids such as triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. For some people, calculated LDL cholesterol goes down, and for others it goes up, sometimes quite a bit. This tendency for some people to see an increase in their LDL cholesterol has been a focus of research over the last decade because the question remains – “What, if anything, does this tell us when assessing one’s risk of heart disease?”

In contrast, some pathologies are considered contra-indicated for KD. Absolute contraindications have been described and summarized by Kossoff et al. (2018) (Table 3). The surgical epilepsies, whenever the patient or caregivers are having difficulty maintaining compliance with the diet, are relative contra-indications for KD (Table 4) (Kossoff et al., 2018).


I won’t sugar coat it. The diet can be hard to start. The first two weeks can be terrible. You give up a lot of comfort foods. Plus, you will need new cookbooks. So, switching to a ketogenic diet isn’t the first thing that pops into your head when you hear cancer. But the diet works. I steadily lost weight without substantial hunger or changes to my limited exercise program. My overall health improved, I slept better, felt better and hopefully look better.

Similar trends in adverse events have been noted in children. One key concern is the high risk of osteoporosis, which reaches as high as 20% in KD cases. Along with osteoporosis come growth issues. “Children on the classic KD do often grow slightly slower than children not on the diet. When the diet stops, there is ‘catch-up’ growth, usually to normal,” said Kossoff.
Take your stress hormone cortisol: It stays highest in the morning and gradually tapers throughout the day. Measuring cortisol in the morning might yield an entirely different result from testing in the evening. Researchers speculate ketogenic diets might raise this stress hormone, but many other factors also come into play here that may have nothing to do with your diet.
I had some eggs and some meat and all this stuff. Then they tested me literally every 30-60 minutes for five hours. I got to see literally what was happening real time after a low carb meal. I think that’s where having the right nutrition really is the basis for knowing where you stand. The other thing for people that are worried about this morning reading, check your A1C. That’s the average of the last 3 months worth of all of your blood sugars, not just the ones in the morning that you’re testing and freaking out about. By the way, when you freak out that also raises your blood sugar.
“There is an ion channel in the membrane of neurons which makes membrane less excitable; a potassium channel which is activated specifically by adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The more ATP is generated, the more this channel is active and the less excitable the neuron becomes,” said Pavel Klein, MD, of the Mid-Atlantic Epilepsy and Sleep Center in Bethesda, Maryland. “It has also been shown that ketone bodies also act directly to reduce the release of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter. When less glutamate is released by a neuron, neighboring neurons are excited less and less prone to generate a seizure.”
• High-protein ketogenic diet — This method is a variant of the SKD. In a high-protein diet, you increase the ratio of protein consumption to 10 percent and reduce your healthy fat consumption by 10 percent. In a study involving obese men that tried this method, researchers noted that it helped reduce their hunger and lowered their food intake significantly, resulting in weight loss.11
For patients interested in Ketogenic diet, it is vitally important that you talk with your health-care providers, says Alice Bender, MS, RDN, AICR’s Director of Nutrition Programs. “A dietitian is best positioned to talk with you about what is known regarding the pros and cons – especially to learn if this diet has any research showing the reasonable application with your particular type of cancer and if the ketogenic diet may even be harmful for you.”
One of the biggest concerns when it comes to following the ketogenic diet is that some people are afraid to try this way of eating simply because they think it can increase their cholesterol and clog their arteries. From the solid scientific studies we will talk about below, a low-carb ketogenic diet is shown to improve your cholesterol levels and can be an incredibly healthy choice.

On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run mostly on fat, burning fat 24-7. When insulin levels become very low, fat burning can increase dramatically. It becomes easier to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is great if you’re trying to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, such as less hunger and a steady supply of energy. This may help keep you alert and focused.
According to a 2015 review of the literature on the ketogenic diet for human glioma patients (32 case studies), “Prolonged remissions ranging from more than 5 years to 4 months were reported in the case reports. Only one of these patients was treated using KD as monotherapy. The best responses reported in the more recent patient series were stable disease for approximately 6 weeks.” 
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