When a person first starts onto a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet, it takes the body several days to a few weeks to shift from relying on glucose to instead rely on fat. During this transition, people may experience what is sometimes referred to as the “keto-flu”—muscle cramps, headaches, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, and sugar and carbohydrate cravings.49 There may also be increased urination which can result in a loss of minerals, such as sodium and potassium. To counter these effects one should strive to get more minerals and in particular, more sodium and potassium, drink plenty of water, get some exercise and ensure adequate caloric intake. Once the body becomes keto-adapted, these symptoms largely resolve, and many people report increased energy, decreased cravings and weight loss.

The MAD aims to provide increased flexibility and palatability, with a 1:1 ratio of fat to carbohydrates and protein, and contains around 65% fat, 25% protein, and 10% carbohydrate (Payne et al., 2018). Fat is encouraged and the carbohydrate intake is limited to 10–20 g/day in children and 15–20 g/day in adults (Kossoff, 2004; Kossoff and Dorward, 2008). Because of carbohydrate restriction, the MAD can also produce urinary ketones (Carrette et al., 2008). The MAD does not require weighing food on a gram scale, or restriction of calories, protein or liquids, and may be a good option for patients who are unable to tolerate a more restrictive diet such as the classical ketogenic diet (KD) (Cervenka et al., 2012). Low-carbohydrate multivitamin and calcium carbonate supplementation is recommended in the MAD (Kossoff et al., 2009).
Finally a publication that explains how to fight cancer with a Ketogenic Diet. Easy to understand and follow. Great for helping those trying to follow this diet for someone who is battling, in our case Brain cancer. Thank you Ellen for all your hard work and dedication to keep this updated in a hope that we, as the readers and caretakers, can extend an awesome quality of life for those battling Glioblastoma Multiforme grade 4.
The ketogenic diet has many potential effects and is likely to have different mechanisms in different diseases [8]. In metabolic conditions, cancer, trauma, and ischemia, the ketogenic diet may confer a protective effect by providing an additional energy substrate to tissue at risk of cell death. However, ketosis may have more complicated effects. In one model, rats fed the ketogenic diet show marked upregulation of both the ketone transporter and the glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1), promoting the influx of nutrients into the brain [9]. These authors provided evidence that the ketogenic diet increases capillary density without increasing overall blood flow, providing a way that the diet may help nourish tissue at risk. This finding is particularly interesting in light of findings in animals with tumors, in which the diet is associated with an anti-angiogenic effect [10,11]. These discordant results eventually will need to be reconciled; they may be due to differences in angiogenic stimuli in normal cells versus malignant cells.

Since my numbers were high my doc ordered a calcium scoring test which shows some mild calcium increase in my lower depending artery which is not normal for a female of my age and health.  Initially he wanted me to abandon the diet and follow a Mediterranean low fat diet.  I suggested I eat more monounsaturated fats but stay on the low carb diet and he agreed. I have seen a great deal of benefit from the low carb diet and am unwilling to give it up at this time.
As I wrote in my book, “Nevertheless on the therapy [Kelley’s] he slowly began to improve, to the point his mental status normalized and over a period of a year, he progressed from a wheelchair to a walker to a cane.” When I completed my study in 1987, he had survived 5 years and was in excellent health, with no evidence of cancer in his brain or spinal canal.
Yes. There is growing evidence showing its usefulness in controlling seizures in adults with medically refractory epilepsy. While some adults may be started on classic ketogenic diet, others will be trained in the modified ketogenic or atkins diet which allows more freedom in dietary choices, and affords them the ability to still enjoy going out to restaurants while maintaining this diet therapy. With proper training and motivation, adults can successfully remain on this diet and gain good control of their seizures. Despite some of the adult ketogenic diets offering a little more flexibility it is still considered a medical therapy and should be initiated and maintained by your medical team.
Uh, no. Not exactly. Preclinical experiments are intriguing but fairly limited in applicability, and the case reports demonstrate nothing of the sort. There’s more to Dr. Seyfried’s hypothesis, for example, his idea that metastatic cancer comes about because of alterations in glutamine metabolism, but unfortunately he appears to misunderstand the genetics of metastasis when he bases part of his conclusion on observations that metastatic cancers often have the same genetic derangements as the primary tumor. It’s been a longstanding question whether clones of tumor cells possess the ability to metastasize as an intrinsic part of the process of becoming cancer cells or whether they acquire it later. Given that evolution is a major force driving cancer cells to become more invasive and that tumors are very heterogeneous, full of lots of different clones with different sets of genetic mutations, Dr. Seyfried’s hypothesis is at best simplistic. Also disappointingly, the evidence for any diet as a treatment for cancer is weak at best.

I knew Bob quite well, and considered him a friend. We first met when I interviewed him for a nutrition story during my journalism days, and later on while I was a medical student, we kept in close contact. During my freshman year at Cornell Medical School – from which Bob had received his own medical degree – I arranged for him to speak as part of a lecture series I had set up on alternative approaches to disease.
In 1970, Robert C. Atkins developed a weight-loss diet that restricted the intake of carbohydrates (Sharma and Jain, 2014), and this diet was later evaluated for seizure treatment. The first patient was a 7-year-old girl with intractable epilepsy due to a left parietal cortical dysplasia, who used the Atkins diet for a week in order to acclimate to the CKD. After 3 days, her seizures stopped, and she remained seizure-free for 3 years with continued dietary treatment (Kossoff et al., 2013). In 2006, this diet was first formally referred to as the “MAD” to distinguish it from the Atkins diet (Kossoff et al., 2013). The MAD has three significant differences from the first version: the induction phase of limiting carbohydrates is maintained indefinitely; high-fat foods are not only allowed, but encouraged; and the primary goal of the diet is seizure control (Atkins, 2002; Sharma and Jain, 2014).
After the 12 weeks intervention, researchers noted that the concentration of LDL particles decreased by 9.6% from 1180 nmol/L 1180 to 1066 nmol/L. [22] As previously mentioned, lower levels of LDL particles are beneficial to cardiovascular fitness. Additionally, the particle size of LDL increased by an average of 5.2% from 20.75 mm to 21.27 mm. [22]
“Your liver produces ketones all the time, but the rate depends on carbohydrate and protein intake,” says Jeff Volek, Ph.D., R.D., a professor of human sciences at Ohio State University. When the majority of your diet is made up of of carbs and protein, ketogenesis slows. Replacing carbs and protein with fat will put your body into ketosis, thus ramping up ketone production. This takes about three days to induce.
One of the absolute worst things conventional medicine does is treat type 2 diabetics with insulin. This only exacerbates the problem. The key to treating and reversing type 2 diabetes is to cut down on net carbs, replacing them with high amounts of healthy fats and moderate amounts of protein. Dr. Tim Noakes has researched reversal of type 2 diabetes in South Africans, coming to the same conclusion.
Westman’s research on carb-restricted diets suggests they can help reduce appetite, spur weight loss and improve markers of heart disease. His findings aren’t outliers. From Atkins and South Beach to Mediterranean and Zone, low-carb, high-fat diets—or “LCHF” plans—are all the rage, and growing evidence suggests they’re a big improvement on the typical carb-heavy American diet. But the “keto” diet is the most carb-restrictive member of the LCHF gang.
There are several studies where researchers implanted human gliomas into the bodies of rats (a completely unrealistic scenario) and reported that the rats put on a ketogenic diet lived longer. In one study, rats with human brain cancer implanted in their bodies lived 56% longer on a ketogenic diet combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. “56% longer” sounds huge until you learn that the mean keto/oxygen therapy survival was 55 days compared to the control rats who lived 31 days. And all the rats still died of cancer.
The ketogenic diet is a way of treating patients with poorly controlled epilepsy. The ketogenic diet is used when a child's seizures have not been controlled with medications or when a child has had bad side effects from the various seizure drugs. The ketogenic diet requires extra time and effort and must be followed exactly, especially during the first months.
Therefore, when you’re following a ketogenic diet plan for beginners, your body is burning fat for energy rather than carbohydrates, so in the process most people lose weight and excess body fat rapidly, even when consuming lots of fat and adequate calories through their daily food intake. Another major benefit of the keto diet is that there’s no need to count calories, feel hungry or attempt to burn loads of calories through hours of intense exercise.
In summary, I think the metabolic theory on cancer is really interesting and there’s already some good evidence to support it. Clearly, we need more research. Whether or not this research will get done is the big question because as we know, two-thirds of medical research is sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. It can be difficult for researchers like Dominic D’Agostino to get funding to do this kind of research because nobody can patent the ketogenic diet and fasting. There’s not as much money as there would be in a kind of miracle drug that targets gene therapy and things like that. That’s one of the reasons there isn’t as much research as there might be otherwise.
When you’re eating the foods that get you there (more on that in a minute), your body can enter a state of ketosis in one to three days, she adds. During the diet, the majority of calories you consume come from fat, with a little protein and very little carbohydrates. Ketosis also happens if you eat a very low-calorie diet — think doctor-supervised, only when medically recommended diets of 600 to 800 total calories.
• Standard ketogenic diet (SKD) — SKD is the type I typically recommend for most people, because it is very effective. It focuses on high consumption of healthy fats: As I explain in my book, "Fat for Fuel," you should aim for having 70 to 85 percent of your total daily calories to come from healthy fats. For your protein intake, the general rule of thumb is to follow the formula of 1 gram of protein for every kilogram of your lean body mass.
The ketogenic diet’s origin dates back to the 1920s when doctors began using it to control seizures among patients with epilepsy. The history of the ketogetnic diet began with a nutritional plan made of carbohydrates (carbs), fat, and protein forces the body to use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy. Dubbed ketosis, this process creates two acids in the blood, ketones and decanoic acid, that our bodies and brains use for fuel.
Russel Wilder first used the ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy in 1921. He also coined the term "ketogenic diet." For almost a decade, the ketogenic diet enjoyed a place in the medical world as a therapeutic diet for pediatric epilepsy and was widely used until its popularity ceased with the introduction of antiepileptic agents. The resurgence of the ketogenic diet as a rapid weight loss formula is a relatively new concept the has shown to be quite effective, at least in the short run.
To determine whether you’re in ketosis and what degree of ketosis you’re in, test your ketones each morning. Blood ketone testing is the most accurate method—I do not recommend breath or urine ketone monitoring. In our practice, we recommend the Precision Xtra Blood Glucose Meter Kit, which can be purchased on Amazon (you can buy test strips for this meter in bulk on eBay for a lower cost). Keto Mojo is another good meter with affordable test strips.
David Book graduated with a PharmD from Drake University. After completing a Drug Information Residency in the greater Atlanta area with Mercer University's College of Pharmacy and InpharmD, he now works full time at an independent pharmacy. Drawn towards innovation and entrepreneurship, his interests include the business of pharmacy, healthcare advocacy, diet & nutrition, and health information technology.

In fact, one study stated that “…the group with the highest risk for cardiovascular events had high LDL-P and LDL-C, while the group with the lowest risk had low LDL-P but higher LDL-C.” [17] As a result of prior clinical research and their findings, the researchers stated that: “While the low carb, ketogenic diet did not lower total LDL cholesterol, it did result in a shift from small, dense LDL to large, buoyant LDL, which could lower cardiovascular disease risk.” [23]

A randomised, controlled clinical trial among 120 overweight adults with high levels of cholesterol compared the effects of a ketogenic diet against a low-fat diet. After 24 weeks, the group following the keto diet reported greater weight loss and declines in the triglyceride levels and higher increases in the HDL cholesterol levels compared to the low-fat group (11).
Everyone talks about upping their fats… I do not think that is the key to sweeping LDL out of the system. Upping cruciferous fiberous veggies… the fiber, vitamins and minerals contained in veggies bind with the LDL and move it on out. You would have to eat literally a truck load to make any serious dent in your daily carb allowance since most are very low net carb anyways.
Similarly, in a 2015 study, mice receiving a combination of hyperbaric oxygen and dietary ketone supplementation showed a clear reduction in tumor growth rate and metastasis.20 Also, these mice lived twice as long as control animals. Based on these results, the study authors state that further investigation into the effectiveness of this combination therapy as a potential treatment for late-stage metastatic cancers is urgently required.
Leanne: Yeah, that’s amazing that you took your health into your own hands. I think that’s so empowering for so many people. When we just say “enough is enough and we need to change.” For me I came at this from the hormone piece, but also we have a strong line of dementia in our family. Very, very strong. For me, it was how can I be as good to my brain as possible? Not only is this good for your heart and everything else, but also looking at the health of your brain, which we talked about with having enough cholesterol is important for our brain function, too.

In a model of PD, neurons cultured from the developing mesencephalon, the site of the future substantia nigra, are susceptible to injury and death from the application of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), which inhibits mitochondrial energy production. Adding one of the ketone bodies, β-hydroxybutyrate, rescues these cells from death and reduction in neurite outgrowth [37]. In an in vivo model, mice treated with β-hydroxybutyrate via continuous subcutaneous infusion were relatively protected from the dopaminergic degeneration induced by injection of MPTP, an MPP+ precursor, apparently by enhancing oxidative phosphorylation and the production of ATP [38].


The patient’s wife, a former college professor with an interest in nutritional medicine, learned about our approach from an article she read in an alternative health journal, and in the fall of 1991 he began treatment with me. Some fifteen months later, repeat CT scans showed stabilization of disease. Since he felt fine at the time, following his program religiously, he decided against any further conventional testing until 1998, seven years after he had started with me, when a series of CT scans confirmed total resolution of his once extensive cancer.
Dr. David Jockers is a functional nutritionist, corrective care chiropractor, exercise physiologist, and certified strength & conditioning specialist. He runs one of the hottest natural health websites: DrJockers.com and is the author of "SuperCharge Your Brain," the complete guide to radically improve your mood, memory, and mindset, and the "SuperCharged Recipe book" with over 180 full-color recipes to help you take back control of your health. He is a regular contributor to thetruthaboutcancer.com and has well over 1,200 professionally published natural health articles on the web and in print magazines. Dr. Jockers is a sought after speaker around the country on such topics as weight loss, brain health, functional exercise, natural detoxification, and disease prevention. He currently owns and operates Exodus Health Center in Kennesaw, Georgia.
Dr. Campos, it is so discouraging to see that you disparage the ketogenic diet based on your assumption that it is very heavy in poor quality processed meats. No diet that relies on processed foods can be viewed as “healthy”. Become better informed by getting up to speed with what Jeff Volek, RD, PhD, calls a “well-formulated ketogenic diet.” Also, learn more about the potential of the diet to slow cancer progression (my specialty). You owe it to your patients who are depending on you for advice. Present them with facts, not opinions.
And don’t associate yourself with Ralph Moss, the number one promoter of laetrile quackery and make easily refuted claims such as the claim that “chemo and radiation do not cure cancer or extend life, although cancer physicians often make this claim” and that radiation “often does more harm than good to the patient.” Given that all Dr. Seyfried has is a couple of case studies as clinical support for his treatment (see below) and I can produce reams of studies over nearly 50 years demonstrating that chemotherapy can cure specific cancers and prolong life when used appropriately, the “2% gambit” notwithstanding, it’s not a winning proposition, and it sure doesn’t help your credibility to use the language of cancer quacks to promote your idea.
If you need to eat more or fewer calories per day, you can adjust accordingly by simply taking out or adding a bit more of the ingredients already included in a recipe. For example, adding/removing a tablespoon of olive oil or butter will add/remove about 100 calories. If you like or dislike certain recipes, feel free to shift things around. Make sure to keep an eye on the calories so you’re still falling within an acceptable range of your daily goal.
For the latest update we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (11 April 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 11 April 2017), MEDLINE (Ovid, 11 April 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov (11 April 2017) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP, 11 April 2017). We imposed no language restrictions. We checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for additional reports of relevant studies.
Its hard to find any information about hyper responders, even harder for me as my total cholestorl levels increased extremely after I went on the keto diet, from an already high 5mmol/dL to extremely high (14mmol/dL or 538mg) which is unheard of, even in the many hyper responder cases I've studied. But my HDL increased to 2.7mmol and my trigicerides stayed the same at good 0.9. Nobody 've seen has such a high total cholestrol. Even as i research how cholestrol doesn't have much link to heart disease mortality, there's no research on anything as high as my case.
The ketogenic diet is indicated as an adjunctive (additional) treatment in children and young people with drug-resistant epilepsy.[26][27] It is approved by national clinical guidelines in Scotland,[27] England, and Wales[26] and reimbursed by nearly all US insurance companies.[28] Children with a focal lesion (a single point of brain abnormality causing the epilepsy) who would make suitable candidates for surgery are more likely to become seizure-free with surgery than with the ketogenic diet.[9][29] About a third of epilepsy centres that offer the ketogenic diet also offer a dietary therapy to adults. Some clinicians consider the two less restrictive dietary variants—the low glycaemic index treatment and the modified Atkins diet—to be more appropriate for adolescents and adults.[9] A liquid form of the ketogenic diet is particularly easy to prepare for, and well tolerated by, infants on formula and children who are tube-fed.[5][30]
Some would argue, however, that these cut-off points are arbitrary and do not apply to all individuals depending on their baseline metabolic health and overall health. For instance, far too many examples exist of people with low LDL levels having heart attacks and those with high LDL having improved longevity. So while these numbers make sense for whole populations, tremendous individual variation exists.
Proponents of the super-high-fat, low-protein approach argue that protein kicks the body out of ketosis by supplying amino acids for gluconeogenesis (simply put, turning non-carbs into fuel); however, research indicates that the impact of dietary protein on gluconeogenesis and glucose flux is nearly negligible, making this argument irrelevant. (42) In my practice, we have found that usual protein intakes (15 to 20 percent of calories) do not have appreciable effects on blood ketone levels. Besides, a super-high-fat, low-protein diet typically has more drawbacks than benefits—it may cause weight gain, muscle loss, fatigue, and chronic hunger. Don’t be afraid of including plenty of protein in your ketogenic diet; protein is a powerful tool that will satiate your appetite while facilitating fat loss and preventing muscle loss.
In 2012, Dr. Thomas Seyfried, a PhD basic science researcher, published the book, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease, announcing to the world that a high-fat, no carbohydrate ketogenic diet represents the solution to cancer prevention as well as to cancer treatment. His monograph has been greeted with much acclaim, though not yet at the level reached at the height of the interleukin-2 hysteria in 1985.
Societies have lived off whole meats, vegetables, and fruit for our entire existence with very little known disease; including multiple cultures that are essentially carnivores. Diseases increased exponentially in the western world once sugar was added to everything and the junk food boom took place. Our bread is even so processed now that it has the same effect on your blood sugar as eating a tablespoon of sugar. (Yes, the average age some lives is greater today than it was before the sugar boom but that is because infant mortality has decreased 200+% in the same timespan and is now in the single digits. The lifespan of someone who made it to adulthood was the same as it is now. Even Socrates lived to be 77 without modern medicine{‘throw drugs at everything”} before being executed.
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