However, this diet is gaining considerable attention as a potential weight-loss strategy due to the low-carb diet craze, which started in the 1970s with the Atkins diet (a very low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, which was a commercial success and popularized low-carb diets to a new level). Today, other low-carb diets including the Paleo, South Beach, and Dukan diets are all high in protein but moderate in fat. In contrast, the ketogenic diet is distinctive for its exceptionally high-fat content, typically 70% to 80%, though with only a moderate intake of protein.
Let me say out front I have no problem with scientists who propose a theory, in short papers or in the case of Dr. Seyfried, in long, detailed books. I do have a problem when scientists go a step further, insisting in the absence of any significant human data or even impressive case histories they have unraveled the mystery of cancer. I am also quite surprised, in the case of Dr. Seyfried, that both alternative and conventional practitioners have risen up in a loud chorus of enthusiasm, as if indeed Dr. Seyfried’s theories are correct, and that he has solved the cancer riddle.
People use a ketogenic diet most often to lose weight, but it can help manage certain medical conditions, like epilepsy, too. It also may help people with heart disease, certain brain diseases, and even acne, but there needs to be more research in those areas. Talk with your doctor first to find out if it’s safe for you to try a ketogenic diet, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.
In this same chapter, there are also two case reports, neither very impressive. The first, written by the mother, tells the story of a four-year old child diagnosed in 2004 with a low-grade (less aggressive) but quite large and inoperable brain tumor. The parents, as the mother writes, entrusted their child into the hands of the experts, who prescribed the usual “gold standard” treatments, which are not clearly described initially but presumably mean chemotherapy and perhaps radiation.
You can change that genetics. I can’t change the genetic tendency, it’s going to be there. By golly, I’m going to pay attention to everything that I put in my mouth for that sake alone. Anyone with that kind of history, I don’t think it’s reason to freak out. I don’t think it’s a reason to think it’s an inevitability for you. It’s just one of those things that you have to pay attention to all of your numbers, anal retentively. That’s why I pay attention to my HSCRP so closely, that’s why I run my numbers so often. I know I have that tendency. I probably, had I not lost the 180 pounds in 2004, I would be in an early grave just like my brother.
Hey David, You will definitely want to do everything you can to mitigate the mold issue. If you cannot remove it from your environment (or yourself from that environment) then you will want to use things like glutathione, liver support, activated charcoal, and daily detoxification strategies as much as possible. For the LDL testing, this is one of the best I know of https://drjockers.com/cardiopower-testing/
The ketogenic diet is proposed as a potential adjuvant therapy by exploiting these differences between cancer and normal cells. Consuming a ketogenic diet reduces blood glucose levels through a drastic reduction in the amount of carbohydrates consumed.1,2 As a result of decreased blood glucose levels, less insulin is secreted, which downregulates signaling pathways that are frequently constitutively active in tumor cells.2 Because glucose metabolism is inhibited, energy must be primarily derived from fats.1 Fat metabolism results in the production of ketone bodies and β-hydroxybutyrate by the liver, which are used to fuel energy production. Cancer cells have difficulty using these pathways because they rely on glucose; the metabolism of fat increases oxidative stress. 
I had some eggs and some meat and all this stuff. Then they tested me literally every 30-60 minutes for five hours. I got to see literally what was happening real time after a low carb meal. I think that’s where having the right nutrition really is the basis for knowing where you stand. The other thing for people that are worried about this morning reading, check your A1C. That’s the average of the last 3 months worth of all of your blood sugars, not just the ones in the morning that you’re testing and freaking out about. By the way, when you freak out that also raises your blood sugar.
What was formerly only qualitative has now become quantitative. What was formerly only probable has now become certain. The era in which the fermentation of the cancer cells or its importance could be disputed is over, and no one today can doubt that we understand the origin of cancer cells if we know how their large fermentation originates, or, to express it more fully, if we know how the damaged respiration and the excessive fermentation of the cancer cells originate.”

All that said, it’s really promising, interesting info here, and we know that a ketogenic diet can be therapeutic in many other situations. There’s not really much downside to the ketogenic diet and fasting if they’re done under supervision. Both can have a lot of beneficial effects in terms of upregulating autophagy—cellular repair process, possibly stem cell regeneration in the case of fasting, for both of those. Ketosis has neurological benefits and many other potentially positive effects when it’s done in the right circumstances, so I don’t see any downside at all in continuing to explore these therapies for cancer treatment.
People use a ketogenic diet most often to lose weight, but it can help manage certain medical conditions, like epilepsy, too. It also may help people with heart disease, certain brain diseases, and even acne, but there needs to be more research in those areas. Talk with your doctor first to find out if it’s safe for you to try a ketogenic diet, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.
Dieter beware: U.S. News & World Report, in its high-profile January cover story on "best diets," calls the DASH and Mediterranean diets tops for health, though these regimens represent the failed nutritional status quo of the last 50 years. It's clear that U.S. News — which employed an expert panel to rate 40 diets on various criteria — merely recapitulated questionable dietary advice that has gone by a succession of names since the 1970s — "low-fat," "DASH," "USDA-style," "plant-based." The basic set of recommendations have remained the same, emphasizing plant foods (grains, cereals, fruits and vegetables) over animal products (eggs, regular dairy, meat), and vegetable oils over natural animal fats such as butter. According to government data, Americans have largely followed these recommendations over the last 50 years, notably increasing their consumption of grains, vegetables and fruits and eating less whole milk, butter, meat and eggs. The outcome? In that time, rates of obesity and Type 2 diabetes have skyrocketed. Something has gone terribly wrong. Why would 25 doctors, dietitians and nutritionists on the U.S. News panel choose a dietary philosophy that has — so far, at least — failed us?
Leanne: Even a lot of my friends who went to the dietetics route, as oppose to the holistic nutrition route, we both were taught the exact same thing when it came to protein. Even my physio and my naturopath, there’s been a lot of misconception about protein. Getting back to the cholesterol and heart disease, if somebody has a history of heart disease in their family and they want to try eating high fat, low carbohydrate, keto … awesome. What you’re saying is perhaps for those types of people, look at your inflammation. Get that under control, while you do the high fat, low carb, keto thing and you’re actually doing your body a major service by switching to that eating style, especially if you have a history of heart disease in your family.

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The ketogenic diet for epilepsy (KDE) was developed in the 1920s by Dr. Hugh Conklin in Michigan. But once effective medications were developed, the diet was used less frequently. It has regained recognition and study and is now a standard backup plan for children whose epilepsy symptoms are difficult to control with medication. With over 300,000 children in the U.S. with seizure disorders, this has become an important addition to the arsenal of treatments for epilepsy. Researchers are beginning to see how it might help adults and people with a variety of neurologic disorders.

To date, evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials is lacking, but needed, to answer the question of whether an adjuvant KD would benefit specific cancer patients. Human data pertaining to KDs and cancer are mostly based on single case reports and a smattering of preliminary clinical studies with small study cohorts, heterogenous study designs, poor compliance to the diet, noncomparable regimens, or without standardized dietary guidance. Even so, results of the first clinical studies support the hypothesis of an anti-tumor effect of KDs. For example, 10 of the 24 (42%) clinical studies included in a recent review [1] provide evidence for the anti-tumor effect of KDs, whereas seven (29%) showed no effect and only one study reported a pro-tumor effect of the KD. The currently available medical literature presents strong scientific evidence for the safe application of a KD only in patients with glioblastoma. However, a clear recommendation for adjuvant use of the KD in glioblastoma patients still requires results from ongoing randomized controlled clinical trials.


Infants and patients fed via a gastrostomy tube can also be given a ketogenic diet. Parents make up a prescribed powdered formula, such as KetoCal, into a liquid feed.[19] Gastrostomy feeding avoids any issues with palatability, and bottle-fed infants readily accept the ketogenic formula.[31] Some studies have found this liquid feed to be more efficacious and associated with lower total cholesterol than a solid ketogenic diet.[18] KetoCal is a nutritionally complete food containing milk protein and is supplemented with amino acids, fat, carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals and trace elements. It is used to administer the 4:1 ratio classic ketogenic diet in children over one year. The formula is available in both 3:1 and 4:1 ratios, either unflavoured or in an artificially sweetened vanilla flavour and is suitable for tube or oral feeding.[51] Other formula products include KetoVolve[52] and Ketonia.[53] Alternatively, a liquid ketogenic diet may be produced by combining Ross Carbohydrate Free soy formula with Microlipid and Polycose.[53]
Now that we have discussed the role of the primary cholesterol molecules, you should have a better understanding of how they work together. Having high LDL isn’t necessarily bad, given that you have adequate HDL to help clear it from the blood stream and that you are not dealing with chronic inflammation. It is also important to have large particle LDL (pattern A) rather than small particle LDL (pattern B).
In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones.
If I was diagnosed with cancer or one of my relatives or friends were diagnosed, I would certainly put the ketogenic diet and fasting at the top of the list of potential treatments to investigate because I see a high potential for benefit and very little downside. You can’t say that about many cancer therapies. As we talked about earlier, the goal with cancer treatment is to find something that inhibits the growth of cancer cells but doesn’t damage healthy cells. Again, there just aren’t that many therapies out there that do that.
One of my favorite patients, whom I have discussed at times in my lectures, was diagnosed in August 1991 with stage IV pancreatic cancer, with multiple metastases into the liver, into the lung, into both adrenals, and into the bone. After a lung biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma, his doctors discouraged chemotherapy, telling him and his wife conventional treatments would only ruin his quality of life while offering no benefit.

The authors defined a VLCKD as a diet lower in 50g of carbohydrates – lower than the daily recommended grams of carb consumption clinicians recommend to diabetics. They included 13 randomized controlled studies with a total of 1,415 subjects. All studies took place for at least a full year and all subjects included were over 18 years old and had a BMI of at least 27.5 kg/m2. In each of these studies, VLCKD diets were compared to low-fat diets.
Jimmy Moore: So close, so far that I think they really need to latch onto what the triglycerides and what the HDL really mean. When you’re eating too many carbs, it’s going to show up in the tricks. It totally will. When you’re not eating enough fat in your diet, especially saturated fat, this is such a key point. I know you hammer this in your videos, that’s why I love them. The saturated fat is so important to raising the HDL, and it’s that HDL that you want to have higher and yet it also shows up in your total cholesterol and then makes the doctors goes bat crap crazy when they see 220 on your total cholesterol, and the only thing that went up was HDL. Come on.
Perhaps the first person to really put ketogenic diets on the map was Dr. Robert C. Atkins, a cantankerous medical doctor who began experimenting with a low-carb diet in 1963. His first book, Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution, was published in 1972. Dr. Atkins died in 2003 from a tragic fall (interestingly, the Atkins website’s timeline does not mention his death), but his diet plan lives on today.
I’m not going to shell out 20k to know my LDL-P. I’d rather assume that I’m part of the 30% who reacts to saturated fat with elevated LDL-P. Should I be worried, considering all my other markers point to the right direction? Expert after expert say that we don’t know what these mixed signals mean until there is a study of people doing low-carb high-fat diets, correlating their lipid profiles with incidence of cardiovascular disease.

7. Raygan, F., Bahmani, F., Kouchaki, E., Aghadavod, E., Sharifi, S., Akbari, E., . . . Asemi, Z. (2016). Comparative effects of carbohydrate versus fat restriction on metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight patients with Type 2 diabetic and coronary heart disease: A randomized clinical trial. PMID: 28607566
Ketogenic diets represent a far more effective strategy for managing type 2 diabetes than the American Diabetes Association’s high-carb, low-fat dietary guidelines. Unlike the ADA’s guidelines, a ketogenic diet significantly reduces blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c levels, waist circumference, and triglycerides in diabetic individuals. (13) Most importantly, research indicates that the diet is sustainable for diabetic patients and that the beneficial changes can be maintained over the long term. (14)
Your child may start the diet in the hospital, so nurses and doctors can observe the first few days. Your child will probably need to go without any food for 36 to 48 hours before beginning the diet. After that, food is gradually increased over a few days. This diet does not provide all the vitamins a body needs, so your child will probably have to take sugar-free vitamin supplements.
Jimmy Moore: I know right? What they didn’t realize was they were putting me at a greater risk for heart disease and they were putting me at a greater risk for having depression and all these kind of mental health issues. Your brain literally needs that cholesterol to run. If you’re not giving it the cholesterol in your diet, and you’re not allowing the natural progression of cholesterol to take place in the body, you’re actually causing harm to your body. This is the analogy I used in Cholesterol Clarity about the role that cholesterol plays in the body, so you say “What is the real problem that we should be paying attention to if it’s not cholesterol?” It’s the inflammation, stupid. Inflammation is really what we need to be paying attention to.

Dietary choices to help prevent breast cancer There are many different causes of breast cancer, including age, genetics, and family history. There are also some factors that people can control, such as diet, smoking, and exercise. In this article, we take a look at the healthful foods that may help prevent breast cancer and also explain which foods to avoid. Read now
The ketogenic diet is a natural, nontoxic metabolic therapy being studied and utilized for cancer prevention and treatment. It works because cancer cells are dependent upon a constant supply of blood sugar (glucose) to stay alive. Normal cells can make energy from both glucose and ketones (metabolic by-products of burning fat), but most cancer cells can only use glucose. Avoiding carbohydrates (starch and sugar) while enjoying delicious and healthy protein and fats will lower blood glucose and increase blood-ketone levels, resulting in a normal body state called nutritional ketosis. Research has shown that nutritional ketosis starves cancer cells while nourishing normal cells and strengthening total body health.
Kidney stones have occurred in about 6 percent of patients and may be increased in younger patients (<3 years of age), and those with hypercalciuria and low urine volume. Oral potassium citrate as a preventative supplement results in urine alkalinization, decreasing the prevalence of kidney stones. Universal supplementation appears to drop the risk of stones to nearly zero.

Russel Wilder first used the ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy in 1921. He also coined the term "ketogenic diet." For almost a decade, the ketogenic diet enjoyed a place in the medical world as a therapeutic diet for pediatric epilepsy and was widely used until its popularity ceased with the introduction of antiepileptic agents. The resurgence of the ketogenic diet as a rapid weight loss formula is a relatively new concept the has shown to be quite effective, at least in the short run.
Low-carbohydrate high fat diets (LCHF diets) consistently improve all other markers of cardiovascular risk — lowering elevated blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, ApoB and saturated fat (especially palmitoleic acid) concentrations, reducing small dense LDL particle numbers, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, blood pressure and body weight while increasing low HDL-cholesterol concentrations and reversing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
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A systematic review of 26 short-term intervention trials (varying from 4-12 weeks) evaluated the appetites of overweight and obese individuals on either a very low calorie (~800 calories daily) or ketogenic diet (no calorie restriction but ≤50 gm carbohydrate daily) using a standardized and validated appetite scale. None of the studies compared the two diets with each other; rather, the participants’ appetites were compared at baseline before starting the diet and at the end. Despite losing a significant amount of weight on both diets, participants reported less hunger and a reduced desire to eat compared with baseline measures. The authors noted the lack of increased hunger despite extreme restrictions of both diets, which they theorized were due to changes in appetite hormones such as ghrelin and leptin, ketone bodies, and increased fat and protein intakes. The authors suggested further studies exploring a threshold of ketone levels needed to suppress appetite; in other words, can a higher amount of carbohydrate be eaten with a milder level of ketosis that might still produce a satiating effect? This could allow inclusion of healthful higher carbohydrate foods like whole grains, legumes, and fruit. [9]
Although the exact role of the keto diet in mental and brain disorders is unclear, there has been proof of its efficacy in patients with schizophrenia. And, to boot, it works to reverse many conditions that develop as a side effect of conventional medications for brain disorders, like weight gain, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risks. More research is needed to understand the role of the ketogenic diet in treating or improving schizophrenia, as the current available studies are either animal studies or case studies, but the benefits of a low carbohydrate, high-fat diet in neurology is promising.
Let me say out front I have no problem with scientists who propose a theory, in short papers or in the case of Dr. Seyfried, in long, detailed books. I do have a problem when scientists go a step further, insisting in the absence of any significant human data or even impressive case histories they have unraveled the mystery of cancer. I am also quite surprised, in the case of Dr. Seyfried, that both alternative and conventional practitioners have risen up in a loud chorus of enthusiasm, as if indeed Dr. Seyfried’s theories are correct, and that he has solved the cancer riddle.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury caused by a blow, bump, or jolt to the head that significantly impairs brain function. TBI is common in military personnel, car accident survivors, and athletes involved in contact or high-risk sports. If left untreated, TBI can cause severe impairments in thinking, memory, and emotional regulation. Interestingly, a ketogenic diet may be an effective strategy for reducing the harmful effects of TBI.

We know now that plaque formation is a culmination of inflammation at the plaque formation site along with a white blood cell mediated interaction between calcium, cholesterol and other biological substances. In fact, it is thought that cholesterol is actually used by the body as a kind of internal bandage when our arterial lining becomes damaged by inflammation. This means that cholesterol build up in the arteries may actually be a protective mechanism.
Regular readers of SBM should know the problem with this sort of approach. No IRB worth its salt would approve such a trial because it would be ethically dubious, but, even worse, it would be ethically dubious and it wouldn’t really tell us anything unless those few patients either had near-miraculous responses or died very quickly. Anything else would simply tell us that the diet is probably doing no harm. More numbers would be needed, particularly if the comparison is to historical controls, to get even an inkling of whether there might be benefit. In that case, you might as well do a proper phase I/II clinical trial, which is what is happening. For instance:
A systematic review of 26 short-term intervention trials (varying from 4-12 weeks) evaluated the appetites of overweight and obese individuals on either a very low calorie (~800 calories daily) or ketogenic diet (no calorie restriction but ≤50 gm carbohydrate daily) using a standardized and validated appetite scale. None of the studies compared the two diets with each other; rather, the participants’ appetites were compared at baseline before starting the diet and at the end. Despite losing a significant amount of weight on both diets, participants reported less hunger and a reduced desire to eat compared with baseline measures. The authors noted the lack of increased hunger despite extreme restrictions of both diets, which they theorized were due to changes in appetite hormones such as ghrelin and leptin, ketone bodies, and increased fat and protein intakes. The authors suggested further studies exploring a threshold of ketone levels needed to suppress appetite; in other words, can a higher amount of carbohydrate be eaten with a milder level of ketosis that might still produce a satiating effect? This could allow inclusion of healthful higher carbohydrate foods like whole grains, legumes, and fruit. [9]
Dr. Josh Axe, DNM, DC, CNS, is a doctor of natural medicine, clinical nutritionist and author with a passion to help people get well using food as medicine. He’s the author of the books “Eat Dirt: Why Leaky Gut May Be the Root Cause of Your Health Problems,” “Essential Oils: Ancient Medicine” and the upcoming “Keto Diet: Your 30-Day Plan to Lose Weight, Balance Hormones, Boost Brain Health, and Reverse Disease” (February 2019, published by Little, Brown Spark). He’s a co-founder of Ancient Nutrition, a health company where the mission is to restore health, strength and vitality by providing history’s healthiest whole food nutrients to the modern world.
It seems to me that your’re presenting conflicting information. Your series had T. Colin Campbell and his research from the China Study. And the healing benefits of a plant based diet. Animal protein causes inflammation. Is there specific science on the ketogenic diet? I know people doing keto long term and they look awful and seem to be sick all the time. I have heard of the keto flu.
To make sure the diet is nutritionally balanced, an experienced dietitian works out exactly how much of which foods the person can eat each day. To help with this, people have individual recipes, are given support on how to plan meals, and are guided on which foods should be avoided. As the diet can be quite restrictive, the dietitian will recommend any vitamin and mineral supplements that are needed.
The ketogenic diet is calculated by a dietitian for each child. Age, weight, activity levels, culture, and food preferences all affect the meal plan. First, the energy requirements are set at 80–90% of the recommended daily amounts (RDA) for the child's age (the high-fat diet requires less energy to process than a typical high-carbohydrate diet). Highly active children or those with muscle spasticity require more food energy than this; immobile children require less. The ketogenic ratio of the diet compares the weight of fat to the combined weight of carbohydrate and protein. This is typically 4:1, but children who are younger than 18 months, older than 12 years, or who are obese may be started on a 3:1 ratio. Fat is energy-rich, with 9 kcal/g (38 kJ/g) compared to 4 kcal/g (17 kJ/g) for carbohydrate or protein, so portions on the ketogenic diet are smaller than normal. The quantity of fat in the diet can be calculated from the overall energy requirements and the chosen ketogenic ratio. Next, the protein levels are set to allow for growth and body maintenance, and are around 1 g protein for each kg of body weight. Lastly, the amount of carbohydrate is set according to what allowance is left while maintaining the chosen ratio. Any carbohydrate in medications or supplements must be subtracted from this allowance. The total daily amount of fat, protein, and carbohydrate is then evenly divided across the meals.[37]

Other genetic disorders caused by mutations limit the availability of energy substrates but do not necessarily cause seizures. One such disease is phosphofructokinase (PFK) deficiency. PFK is the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis for the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Patients with mutations in the muscle isoform of PFK demonstrate exercise intolerance with myalgias and stiffness. There also are rare infantile forms, such as a case reported by Swoboda et al. [21, Class III], with myopathy and arthrogryposis. This patient displayed marked gains in muscle strength and improvement in his developmental milestones after being placed on the ketogenic diet.
The Keto diet emphasizes weight loss through fat-burning. The goal is to quickly lose weight and ultimately feel fuller with fewer cravings, while boosting your mood, mental focus and energy. According to Keto proponents, by slashing the carbs you consume and instead filling up on fats, you safely enter a state of ketosis. That’s when the body breaks down both dietary and stored body fat into substances called ketones. Your fat-burning system now relies mainly on fat – instead of sugar – for energy. While similar in some ways to familiar low-carb diets, the Keto diet’s extreme carb restrictions – about 20 net carbs a day or less, depending on the version – and the deliberate shift into ketosis are what set this increasingly popular diet apart.
The ketogenic diet also may protect against the deposition of amyloid. Van der Auwera et al. [41] studied the ketogenic diet’s effects on AD using a transgenic mouse model of AD in which mice express a mutated human amyloid precursor protein gene in postmitotic neurons. These mice develop significant soluble Aβ by 3 months of age, and then brain plaques by 12 to 14 months. They also demonstrate behavioral deficits in tests of object recognition. In their study, 16 mice were fed a regular diet until 3 months of age, at which point 8 mice were switched to the ketogenic diet, without restriction on intake. After about 40 days on the diet, the animals fed the ketogenic diet had 25% less soluble Aβ in their brains. However, they did not perform any differently on tests of cognitive function than the mice fed a standard diet. The prevailing paradigm that reductions in Aβ deposition may delay progression in AD makes these findings particularly intriguing; perhaps a longer period on the ketogenic diet would reveal some behavioral differences between the two groups of mice.
Your child will begin the ketogenic diet within 24 hours of being admitted to the hospital. The diet contains a fixed amount of calories, carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Each meal has to be measured exactly and all the ingredients weighed in this diet. For young infants, pre-made, ready-to-use ketogenic formulas are available for use. Your child may also need supplements such as vitamins and extra calcium.
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome – Since PCOS shares many symptoms and underlying causes with metabolic syndrome, it has been hypothesized that women suffering from PCOS might benefit from a ketogenic diet in a similar fashion to those suffering from metabolic syndrome. One small pilot study of overweight and obese women with PCOS following a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet for six months saw significant improvements in many markers of the disease, such as free testosterone, and fasting insulin.43
Why does everyone simply condemn meat as a possible cause of cancer? It’s not about the meat of chickens or beef but the way they are raised these days! Farms raised chickens are in such tight quarters that they are not even able to sit down and are prone to disease. So what do they do? Feed them “antibiotics”! Then they feed them pesticide laden food! Then to quickly fatten them up they are given hormones to promote growth. Beef/cows are also living in crowded barns and fed grain with growth hormones added and pesticide laden HMO grain. Is it any wonder that we are exposed to getting cancer? If we all are outraged by this practice and we should be, we would be switching to organic meat, raised cage free without pesticides, hormones, or antibiotics. Some companies and food markets are beginning to realize this as a problem and have greatly enlarged their organic sections lately! Check your labels when shopping!
Jimmy Moore: So close, so far that I think they really need to latch onto what the triglycerides and what the HDL really mean. When you’re eating too many carbs, it’s going to show up in the tricks. It totally will. When you’re not eating enough fat in your diet, especially saturated fat, this is such a key point. I know you hammer this in your videos, that’s why I love them. The saturated fat is so important to raising the HDL, and it’s that HDL that you want to have higher and yet it also shows up in your total cholesterol and then makes the doctors goes bat crap crazy when they see 220 on your total cholesterol, and the only thing that went up was HDL. Come on.
Excessive LDL particles have been found to be associated with the development of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart disease. In atherosclerosis, LDL particles are known to end up in damaged artery walls, and connected to an inflammatory response. Over time, cholesterol, calcium, white blood cells and other substances accumulate at the site to form a plaque. Most heart attacks and strokes are caused when a plaque ruptures and forms a clot that blocks arterial blood flow.

Mitochondria are the main power generators in our body’s cells and also play a prominent role in antioxidant activities and calcium buffering. The number of mitochondria present in any cell is directly related to its metabolic requirements, and can range from a solitary mitochondrion to thousands of them. In fact, mitochondria enable cells to generate up to 15 times more ATP than they could otherwise!


Bulk buy and cook. If you’re someone who doesn’t like to spend a lot of time in the kitchen, this is the best of both worlds. Buying your food at bulk (specifically from wholesalers) can reduce the cost per pound tremendously. Plus, you can make ahead food (bulk cook chicken thighs for pre-made meat, or cook entire meals) that are used as leftovers, so you spend less time cooking.
Researchers also observed that the size of VLDL particle size did not change in either of the groups. However, they noted that the total number of VLDL particles decreased by 19% from 76.2 nmol/L to 61.7 nmol/L. [22] More specifically, large VLDL particles reduced by 40.2% from 3.33 nmol/L to 1.74 nmol/L, medium VLDL particles decreased by 4.8% from 46.2 nmol/L to 44 nmol/L. [22]
Can’t you take ketone supplements? No. While it is possible to elevate ketones by taking them, “without the low-carb stimulus, there is no net increase in ketone production, no decrease in insulin, and no net increase in fat oxidation,” says Volek. Don’t trust trainers or “body hackers” who say you can induce ketosis quickly without changing your diet.
One way to tell if the keto diet may not be ideal for you is if your total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio is above 4 and/or your LDL-P remain high or increase after starting the keto diet. If this is the case for you, then it may indicate that you have a particular condition that requires you to make adjustments to your keto diet or follow a completely different diet altogehter. [27]
A high carbohydrate intake can exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by feeding opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria in the gut. (29) These microbes ferment dietary carbohydrates, producing gases that increase intraabdominal pressure, a driving force behind acid reflux and GERD. The gas manufactured by these bacteria also contributes to bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea in IBS.

Hey David, You will definitely want to do everything you can to mitigate the mold issue. If you cannot remove it from your environment (or yourself from that environment) then you will want to use things like glutathione, liver support, activated charcoal, and daily detoxification strategies as much as possible. For the LDL testing, this is one of the best I know of https://drjockers.com/cardiopower-testing/
The goal of this eBook is to help people affected with cancer utilize a ketogenic diet to manage the disease and better tolerate chemotherapy and radiation protocols they may face. It provides a complete resource for planning a ketogenic diet; however, it is not intended to be a self-help book but rather an adjunct to the care, treatment, and monitoring of progress on a ketogenic diet provided by the attending physician.
After my original lengthy conversation with Dr. Kelley, my research mentor Dr. Good suggested that during my summer break I begin an informal review of Kelley’s patient charts located in his Dallas office. From my first day in Dallas, I found among Kelley’s records patient after patient with appropriately diagnosed poor prognosis or what would be considered terminal disease such as metastatic pancreatic and metastatic breast cancer, who had done well under his care for many years, often with documented regression of his disease.
Although the ketogenic diet has been around for a long time and may be efficacious in many medical conditions, there is a surprising dearth of long-term studies on its safety. The bulk of the information comes from children using a ketogenic diet for epilepsy. Negative effects seen in children on a ketogenic diet long-term (≥2 years) are poor growth (while on the diet), kidney stones, and dyslipidemia (elevated cholesterol and/or triglycerides). Many of these effects can be overcome with careful attention to mineral intake while on the diet and/or termination of the diet.52 Most long-term studies evaluating adults using a ketogenic diet for weight loss have found very few serious adverse effects.53 54 55 56 However it should be noted that these studies only looked at one year duration on the diet, and poor adherence to the diet was frequently noted as a problem.
The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains, and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream, and butter.[1] Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[4][5]
The biggest shifts in your daily habits will be how you food shop and how you cook, and recipes that are ketogenic need to be followed rather than just low-carb. You will require the healthy fats in order to get into ketosis and have enough energy without the carbs. And you will be considerably more energetic and healthier when cooking your own keto-friendly food rather than buying supposedly keto foods off the shelf.
We also maintain a certain amount of stored sugar as glycogen, found in the liver and muscle and formed when glucose molecules link up to one another in complex chains. In times of need and if deprived of dietary carbohydrates, our liver and muscle cells can break down glycogen into glucose for release into the bloodstream. Our liver cells can also, when necessary, convert certain amino acids such as alanine into glucose.
Clinical improvement was observed in Alzheimer’s patients fed a ketogenic diet, and this was marked by improved mitochondrial function. (15) In fact, a European Journal of Clinical Nutrition study pointed to emerging data that suggested the therapeutic use of ketogenic diets for multiple neurological disorders beyond epilepsy and Alzheimer’s, including headaches, neurotrauma, Parkinson’s disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism and multiple sclerosis. (16)
Kidney stones have occurred in about 6 percent of patients and may be increased in younger patients (<3 years of age), and those with hypercalciuria and low urine volume. Oral potassium citrate as a preventative supplement results in urine alkalinization, decreasing the prevalence of kidney stones. Universal supplementation appears to drop the risk of stones to nearly zero.
This device measures the amount of acetone (another ketone) you release in your breath when you are in ketosis. (Acetone is also the ketone responsible for bad breath when you’re in ketosis.) There are a number of kits on the market. One study showed they are as effective as ketone strips for testing ketone levels, but critics argue both have drawbacks including testing for only one specific ketone.
The issue with the Warburg effect is that it leads to a shift in metabolism that favors glycolysis. As a result of this shift, tumor cells tend to use a lot more glucose than normal cells because glycolysis is much less efficient at converting glucose into ATP molecules used for cellular energy than oxidative phosphorylation. One reason that this is thought to provide a growth advantage to cancer cells is because oxidative phosphorylation requires oxygen while glycolysis does not and cancers frequently outgrow their blood supply such that they often live and grow in tissue spaces where there is not much oxygen. In any case, the avidity of cancer cells for glucose has been known a long time and is the basis for positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, where a radiolabeled derivative of glucose is the most commonly used tracer for exactly that reason: Tumor cells take it up much more avidly than do normal cells, leading to ugly black blobs (old-fashioned PET scans alone) or pretty bright blobs (PET-CT) where there are tumor masses in the scans.
Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.

My latest blood work showed great HDL, VLDL, my LDL is just a bit high and my doc is saying we should do something about it. I don’t want to go on cholesterol meds they gave me leg cramps and other side effects I didn’t like. I think if he lets me give it more time that number could come down as well. I’ve lost 23lbs since January when I started Keto, my sugars are back to normal all other blood work is great! I’m going to try to add more of the avocado, coconut and olive oil and see what happens.
Animal data suggest a role for the ketogenic diet in protection against trauma and ischemia, as ketones may be a preferred fuel in the injured brain [27]. Prins et al. [27] studied the role of the ketogenic diet in a controlled cortical impact model in rats. Young rats of varying postnatal ages underwent a small craniotomy and then, with the dura intact, were subjected to a standardized piston cylinder injury. Immediately after the impact, the rats started a standard diet or the ketogenic diet. After 1 week, a postmortem measurement of cortical contusion area was performed. The contusion area was significantly decreased in postnatal day-35 and day-45 rats that had been fed the ketogenic diet, but not in younger or older rats.
A popular keto supplement are exogenous ketones (popularly called “keto diet pills”) that may help you achieve results earlier as well as remain in that state. (Don’t confuse exogenous ketones with raspberry ketones, as the latter don’t raise ketone levels in the body or mimic endogenous ketones, so you wouldn’t use raspberry ketones in your regimen.)
If you lift weights on a ketogenic diet, you might fear losing muscle mass taking in lower amounts of protein. That doesn’t seem to be the case since your body preferentially utilizes fat rather than protein during ketosis. Growth hormone, an anabolic hormone sometimes called your fountain-of-youth hormone because it keeps you lean and toned, plays a major role in regulating muscle growth and development, stimulating muscle protein synthesis. Researchers find a very-low carbohydrate diet with sufficient protein does not affect growth hormone levels, at least in the short-term. If you’re a regular lifter, you might want to consider slightly increasing your protein intake during workout days and supplementing with a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplement. Cyclical keto, where you would eat a higher-carbohydrate diet during your workout days, also makes for a smart strategy to maintain muscle.
A ketogenic diet promotes healing of the brain following TBI by increasing the activity of genes genes involved in energy metabolism, stimulating the generation of new mitochondria, and inhibiting the production of damaging reactive oxygen species in the brain. (24) In animal models of TBI, a ketogenic diet reduces cerebral edema and neuronal cell death while improving behavioral outcomes. (25, 26) While individual success stories of people using a ketogenic diet for TBI are easy to find on the internet, formal clinical trials are still needed.

It is an oversimplification that cancer cells use anaerobic fermentation all the time. Tumors have hypoxic zones and normoxic (aerobic) zones, with a symbiotic relationship between the two. Hypoxic cancer cells derive energy from fermentation of glucose, and secrete lactate. Normoxic cancer cells prefer and attract lactate as fuel for the TCA cycle, sparing glucose for the hypoxic cells. Cancer cells can switch fairly quickly between hypoxic and normoxic states, and may oscillate between the two. [NCBI, “Tumor cell metabolism: an integral view”]
Just from researching that I have been doing, this information seems to make a lot of sense and I may have found some information that is pertinent as to why many of you have experienced a rise in LDL levels. VLDL become LDLs when they drop the triglyceride. So, as we consume less carbs we start to lose triglycerides and the VLDLs start to become LDLs. I am no professional by any means, but as I read that article it made sense as well. It takes a while for some people’s livers to start to get the picture and send out more HDL to round up the LDL and there are things that we can do to aid that process such as adding olive oil and coconut oil to our diets as well as eating purple produce and exercising, but the LDL count will probably rise at first and slowly drop from thereafter. It will probably drop faster if we are taking steps to raise our HDL. The longer our body (liver) has been exposed to an unhealthy diet, the longer it will take to recover from it.
I wanted to put it out there that I made this meal plan specifically with women in mind. I took an average of about 150 women and what their macros were. The end result was 1600 calories – broken down into 136g of fat, 74g of protein, and 20g net carbs a day. This is all built around a sedentary lifestyle, like most of us live. If you need to increase or decrease calories, you will need to do that on your own terms.
Spices are an easy way of adding more flavor, vitamins and antioxidants into your food. Furthermore, they are low in carbohydrates. Make sure that you're using fresh, organic spices for maximum flavor and nutrients. Some spices sold in packets found at the local grocery should not be used, as they often contain fillers that can increase your carbohydrate consumption, thus putting you out of ketosis.26
It seems to me that your’re presenting conflicting information. Your series had T. Colin Campbell and his research from the China Study. And the healing benefits of a plant based diet. Animal protein causes inflammation. Is there specific science on the ketogenic diet? I know people doing keto long term and they look awful and seem to be sick all the time. I have heard of the keto flu.
Leanne: Yeah, it’s really scary and I actually read Good Calories, Bad Calories and did a review on it on YouTube, and going through that whole thing it really paints a really scary picture about how this all came about. It’s really concerning and that’s why I know that you do what you do and I do what I do because we just want to share … this might not be exactly where you want to go with your health and do the research and it’s really great. I know that a lot of doctors, at least in Canada, refuse to do that NMR test.

On a “strict” (standard) keto diet, fats typically provides about 70 percent to 80 percent of total daily calories, protein about 15 percent to 20 percent, and carbohydrates just around 5 percent. However, a more “moderate” approach to the keto diet is also a good option for many people that can allow for an easier transition into very low-carb eating and more flexibility (more on these types of plans below).
I am a board-certified medical oncologist with 30 years experience in caring for cancer patients and another 20 years of research in cancer medicine dating back to 1963. Seyfried’s “Cancer as a Metabolic Disease” is the most significant book I have read in my 50 years in this field. It should be required reading of all cancer specialists, physicians in general, scientific researchers in the field of cancer and for medical students. I cannot overstate what a valuable contribution Thomas Seyfried has made in writing this masterpiece.
Hi Barb, That can definitely be it. Losing when you are close to goal can be more difficult. It could also be that your body’s healthy weight is a little higher than what you’d like – which doesn’t mean you can’t lose, but makes it more difficult. If just eating Keto foods isn’t working, double check the macros for your weight and see if the amount you’re eating needs to be adjusted. You’ll find more help and support in our support group here.
I want you to meet my daughter Alina. She was a bright 28-year-old college graduate. She was working as an accountant for CA. She was happy, successful, a picture of health. She had occasional headaches, but the doctors didn’t seem concerned. In September of 2016, we ended up in the emergency room. The doctors found a massive brain tumor. Alina had two surgeries to remove the tumor followed by the devastating news that she had stage 4 glioblastoma, otherwise known as GBM. GBM has been in the news recently because of senator McCain. It is an aggressive, fast-growing brain cancer. The average survival time is 12 months. 25% of patients survive one year, and 5% survive five years.
When ketones are present in the body fluids at elevated concentrations, a person is said to be in ketosis. Dietary ketosis is a normal physiological response to sustained low carbohydrate intake that results in lowered blood glucose and insulin levels and stimulates the production of something known as ketone bodies. During ketosis, fats, either from the diet or from body stores, become the obligatory source of cellular energy for most body tissues while ketone bodies are produced in the liver to supply the rest of the body’s energy needs.4 Dietary ketosis should not be confused with diabetic ketoacidosis, a pathological condition that occurs mainly in type I diabetics due to an acute severe insulin deficiency (usually due to missing insulin injections) and a resulting inability to use glucose, though it is abundant. During diabetic ketoacidosis, blood ketone levels can be as high as 10-15 mM/l (significantly higher than what can be achieved in dietary ketosis). As ketone production exceeds the tissues’ ability to use them, the ketones build up and the blood pH is lowered.5 Immediate medical attention is required to prevent serious complications. This document deals with dietary ketosis only.
Just because your favorite celebrity endorses a program doesn’t mean you should try it. No plan works for everyone, and that goes double for ketogenic diets. As I mentioned before, while they can initially create fat loss, ketogenic diets were never designed to help you lose weight. Especially if you’re eating too many calories—very possible on a high-fat ketogenic diet—you can be in ketosis and not lose weight (or even gain weight). Likewise, many people lose weight just fine without ever "going keto."
Animal proteins (meat, fish, etc.) have very little, if any, carbs. You can consume them in moderate amounts as needed to control hunger. Overall, choose fattier cuts of meat rather than leaner ones. For example, chicken thighs and legs are preferable to chicken breasts because they contain much more fat. We’ve got quick keto diet chicken recipes to help.
A recent systemic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the long-term effects (greater than 1 year) of dietary interventions on weight loss showed no sound evidence for recommending low-fat diets. In fact, low-carbohydrate diets led to significantly greater weight loss compared to low-fat interventions. It was observed that a carbohydrate-restricted diet is better than a low-fat diet for retaining an individual’s BMR. In other words, the quality of calories consumed may affect the number of calories burned. BMR dropped by more than 400 kcal/day on a low-fat diet when compared to a very low-carb diet.
The ketogenic diet also has been used in glycogenosis type V (McArdle disease), which is caused by a defect in the muscle-specific isozyme of glycogen phosphorylase. Glycogen phosphorylase is necessary to break down glycogen into free glucose for use as an energy source in muscles. When the ketogenic diet was applied to a patient with this disorder (presumably providing an alternative means of energy production), the patient’s exercise tolerance improved and there was a trend toward decreased baseline creatine kinase levels [22, Class III].
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